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Daniel Peretti
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Hi

Postby Daniel Peretti » Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:26 pm

So. I've read through some of the site now and then, but haven't had much time for things like this. Still, I'm in the midst of writing my doctoral dissertation, so I thought that giving myself other things to do at my desk would be ideal right now.

I'm a big fan of Mr. Ellison's work, going back to when I was about 18 and picked up Mefisto in Onyx on a shelf in a bookstore in Toronto. I was fortunate enough to adapt "The Cheese Stands Alone" as a short film (a movie which Harlan said was ok, but I've come to think of as one of the worst crimes I've ever perpetrated on my friends). My favorite story has to be "On the Downhill Side," for reasons perhaps too personal to go into here.

I spend most of my days writing and reading, and I've enjoyed and been enlightened by much of what's posted here. I thought it might be fun to join the party, contribute a bit, and see what comes of it.

Oh, for what it's worth, I'm a folklorist.

Nice to meet you all.
Dan

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Postby Moderator » Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:38 pm

Daniel -
A belated welcome to the demesne.

What's the doctorate in (so that we may assiduously bow to your expertse -- or not)?

Glad you introduced yourself, glad to have you among us.

Steve B
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

Daniel Peretti
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Postby Daniel Peretti » Wed Jun 06, 2007 6:14 pm

Thanks, Steve.

I'm studying folklore. My department's called Folklore and Ethnomusicology, but I haven't done much with the music part of it. Mostly I work with handmade objects and storytelling. Lots of Greek and Norse stuff.
Dan

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Wed Jun 06, 2007 6:37 pm

Welcome to your new home!

I became very active here when I wrote my master's thesis as well.

rich

Postby rich » Thu Jun 07, 2007 7:17 am

Any relation to Frank Peretti? Just curious. I've only been able to read the blurbs on the backs of Peretti's books, and I haven't quite made the leap yet.

(And I don't mean to sound snippy or snooty. I'm just aware of Frank Peretti as a name so I know nothing of his writing abilities--didn't want to give any impression that I've actually read him--but I'm a sarcastic creature, and sometimes I just can't help it.)

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Thu Jun 07, 2007 8:28 am

Welcome to the party, Daniel.

Greek and Norse, huh? Way cool. Norse mythology seems to be one of those phases (at least it used to be) that every guy goes through early on, like being a dinosaur nut. Haven't touched it in decades, though I'm currently reading a book about saurian evolution in relation to low oxygen levels.

I was in the Chorus of a production of Euripides's "Alcestis" two years ago and may join the cast of a rare production of Aristophanes's "Peace" this fall (Classic Greek Theatre of Oregon). We do new translation/adaptations by the artistic director, Keith Scales.


(Are you familiar with a small British press that specializes in folklore -- maybe Celtic, maybe more generally European? I can't remember the name at the moment, but the founder-publisher is an American who grew up in Eugene, Oregon, attended a rival high school, and I used to go up against in debate and extemporaneous speaking. We both attended Harvard College, too, but I haven't kept in touch with him. . . .)
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:08 am

David Loftus wrote:(Are you familiar with a small British press that specializes in folklore -- maybe Celtic, maybe more generally European? I can't remember the name at the moment, but the founder-publisher is an American who grew up in Eugene, Oregon, attended a rival high school, and I used to go up against in debate and extemporaneous speaking. We both attended Harvard College, too, but I haven't kept in touch with him. . . .)


The names came to me at the end of my morning shower: Jeffrey Mazo, Hisarlik Press.

According to Google, Jeff appears to be editor of a journal called "Survival" now, and the Hisarlik links are turning up dead, so maybe it's defunct.

Hisarlik published several books on the history of morris dancing, which activity I pursued for several decades, and that is how I rediscovered Jeff's existence.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

Daniel Peretti
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Postby Daniel Peretti » Thu Jun 07, 2007 6:14 pm

Sorry, Rich, no relation to Frank Peretti--at least as far as I know. Everyone on the Peretti side of my family lives in Canada or Italy, and I think he lives out west somewhere. I haven't ready his books, either. People who do read them seem to like them a lot, though. For me, they're a maybe-someday thing.

David, I haven't heard of that publisher. I know what you mean about the Norse and dinosaur stuff being something guys go through. I just never let the myths go. Can't get enough of them, really.
Dan

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Postby markabaddon » Fri Jun 08, 2007 12:52 pm

Welcome Daniel.

A question for you as a folklorist: I have had an interest in mythology and folklore for many years. Some time ago, I read a translation of the Icelandic Eddas. I was trying to remember, are they the earliest mythological stories in Western Europe?

Mark
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Postby paul » Sat Jun 09, 2007 1:03 am

Welcome Dan!
Go get 'em with the dissertation. Knowledge is good.

Cheers,
Paul
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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Mon Jun 11, 2007 11:12 am

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing . . . but a lot of knowledge is good for conversation, and sometimes even employment.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

Daniel Peretti
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Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:04 pm
Location: Bloomington, Indiana

Postby Daniel Peretti » Mon Jun 11, 2007 9:36 pm

markabaddon wrote:Welcome Daniel.

A question for you as a folklorist: I have had an interest in mythology and folklore for many years. Some time ago, I read a translation of the Icelandic Eddas. I was trying to remember, are they the earliest mythological stories in Western Europe?

Mark


Mark,

Thanks for the welcome. The Eddas were written down no earlier than the eleventh century of this era, which makes them at least 1700 years later than the myths in Homer. The stories behind the Eddas are much older, and some people think they come from the same sources as many of the Greek myths. But the Eddas, and all of the scandinavian myths, are versions of Indo-European stuff, which goes back a long way. One way to look at those stories is that a group of people living about 5000 years before Christ migrated west and split into groups that became the Greeks, Romans, Germanians, Scandinavians, etc. They all had the same stock of old stories, but through the millennia the stories changed as the people changed. There are still striking similarities to all of the mythologies, and to the languages. I hope this answers the question, at least with something more than the cop out of "nobody knows for sure."
Dan

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Jun 12, 2007 7:37 am

Is it known whether Gilgamesh pre- or post-dates Homer? (Of course, Homer was working with characters who undoubtedly had been around a lot longer -- at least the gods.)

Are there any known myth stories from Sanskrit?
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby Moderator » Tue Jun 12, 2007 8:53 am

This is why I like this place.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

Daniel Peretti
Posts: 6
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 7:04 pm
Location: Bloomington, Indiana

seems like you guys are giving me a chance to show off a bit

Postby Daniel Peretti » Tue Jun 12, 2007 1:57 pm

David Loftus wrote:Is it known whether Gilgamesh pre- or post-dates Homer? (Of course, Homer was working with characters who undoubtedly had been around a lot longer -- at least the gods.)

Are there any known myth stories from Sanskrit?


David,

Yeah, Gilgamesh pre-dates the Iliad by at least 1200 years (and it's been a while since I studied that stuff, so it may even be a thousand years earlier than that). Homer is pretty well established as 8th century bc. The Enuma Elish, another Babylonian epic (about Marduk slaying Tiamat) is from a bit earlier than Gilgamesh. Either 2000 or 3000 bc. I think I'm supposed to be all politically correct and use bce now (before the current era). Oh well.

Sanskrit is the language of the Vedas, I think. But I'm not so sure about this stuff. They're ancient hymns, if memory serves. Very old stuff as well. Haven't read any of that, though.
Dan


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