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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Thu May 10, 2007 12:06 pm

Tony, thanks for the heads up on the movie version of Mimzy. From the short bit I read on IMDB, it sounds like there might have been some significant departures from the original short story, but I will definitely check out the film once it hits video.

Unfortunately, I was not able to keep the Best of C.L. Moore collection (my Dad took that copy when I inherited this book collection, and I am going to have to steal it back one day) but I have heard that her stories are just as well crafted as Kuttner's.

One aspect of his work that surprised me was how funny it is. Stories like The Twonky and The Misguided Halo are well written tales that also have a funny, irreverant tone to them that is fairly unusual in speculative fiction.

David, have you ever done any reading of Poe's works?
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Postby David Loftus » Thu May 10, 2007 12:25 pm

markabaddon wrote:David, have you ever done any reading of Poe's works?


Not exactly. I've read "The Tell-Tale Heart" as part of an evening of Halloween stories (along with a Collier and a Dr. Seuss), but not a full hour or more of just Poe.

I read a bunch of him a year or more ago to try to prepare an evening of it, but was dissatisfied -- both with Poe generally and as fodder for a reading in particular. The craft and tone didn't appeal to me that much, generally speaking; a lot of the stories featured just fevered narration as opposed to the give-and-take of good dialogue that makes for a more interesting reading; and some of the stuff was just plain embarrassing (e.g., the jigaboo character in "The Gold Bug").

I was tempted to put together an evening that consisted of "Heart," "The Cask of Amontillado," and the cannibalistic section of The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym (now THERE's a weird story), but . . . well . . . maybe someday.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Thu May 10, 2007 2:03 pm

Do tell, exactly what Seuss did you read in conjunction with Poe and Collier?

The Cask of Amontillado is one of my favorites, as is The Murders in the Rue Morgue and the Masque of the Red Death but you are correct, some of Poe's stuff is just plain weird. Been a while since I looked at Arthur Gordon Pym, but I do remember feeling it was a bit outre when I did read it
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Postby David Loftus » Thu May 10, 2007 2:13 pm

markabaddon wrote:Do tell, exactly what Seuss did you read in conjunction with Poe and Collier?



The third story in the Sneetches collection, a wonderful tale called "What Was I So Scared Of?"
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby David Loftus » Fri May 11, 2007 10:18 am

Moore and Kuttner might be a good source to investigate for a Story Time. . . .
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby markabaddon » Fri May 11, 2007 12:13 pm

The aforementioned "Mimzy" would be an excellent choice to read although I am not sure it would meet your criteria (unsure of the timeframe when material enters the public domain)

By the way, as someone who enjoys hearing a story read aloud, I would strongly suggest Neil Gaiman's stories of "Snow, Glass, Apple" and "Murder Mysteries" produced by the Seeing Ear theater. "Snow"'s lead character is voiced by the incomparable Bebe Neuwirth and "Murder Mysteries" star Brian Dennehy. Highest recommendation
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Fri May 11, 2007 12:32 pm

D.L. wrote:a lot of the stories featured just fevered narration as opposed to the give-and-take of good dialogue that makes for a more interesting reading

I never considered that aspect of your job. Boy, I imagine reading a dialogue scene is quite difficult, lending a voice to different people and dealing with interspersed narration and saidisms. If I were to do reading, I would most definitely go for the "fevered narration" of Poe! For me that would be the real challenge and part of the fun, keeping people interested in narration.

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Postby Ezra Lb. » Mon Jun 04, 2007 10:51 am

This was posted previously over in the Pavillion and sorta got swamped by all the birthday greetings, so let me repeat it...


To whom it may concern...

The wonderful writer THOMAS LIGOTTI has made available an online version of his forthcoming nonfiction treatise/essay/survey of weird/dark/fantasy/horror, THE CONSPIRACY AGAINST THE HUMAN RACE, for critical comment/response/spelling error correction, on this here website http://www.ligotti.net/

If you want to read his fiction, he has a "best of" collection out now called THE SHADOW AT THE BOTTOM OF THE WORLD from Cold Spring Press. If you don't know this guy prepare to be astounded. Because of his early work he is often associated with the "Lovecraft" crowd but his real precursors are Borges & Burroughs (Wiiliam S) & Bruno Schultz. And like YOU KNOW WHO he is the master of the short story that buzzes around in your head for days like bees in a bucket.

Oh yeah I'm a raving fan.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Mon Jun 04, 2007 11:46 pm

Jan wrote:
D.L. wrote:a lot of the stories featured just fevered narration as opposed to the give-and-take of good dialogue that makes for a more interesting reading

I never considered that aspect of your job. Boy, I imagine reading a dialogue scene is quite difficult, lending a voice to different people and dealing with interspersed narration and saidisms. If I were to do reading, I would most definitely go for the "fevered narration" of Poe! For me that would be the real challenge and part of the fun, keeping people interested in narration.



It's not hard, it's fun. And that's why I don't call it a job. (Well, that and it doesn't pay well, when it does at all!) Before too much longer, you should get a chance to hear a couple-minute free sample of me doing Holmes and Watson (and maybe some other British voices), and you'll get a sense of what I can do.

I get a big kick out of reading scenes with dialogue, especially if the characters contrast a lot, like the rich old magnate, the flapper, and the black crew in Fitzgerald's "The Offshore Pirate," for example.

Or like tonight: For my second Jack London story I read a strange one called "The Madness of John Harned," which is set at a bullfight in Quito, Ecuador just after the turn of the twentieth century. It's narrated by one of the Ecuadorian hosts, so I did even the narration with a Spanish accent, but it also had several speaking roles by Spaniards (including the stunningly beautiful Maria Valenzuela), and the contrasting American (who may have gotten a lee-tle John Wayne-ish).

I gotta say, though . . . the story I HAD to do, "To Build A Fire," despite a near total absence of dialogue of any sort, is still a riveting read for a live audience because of its clarity of detail and incredibly skilled heightening of suspense.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:33 am

Has Harlan ever heard you do one of his?
If you don't get paid well for your readings, maybe you should send your stuff out or get an agent because you're in the exact right business, everybody's looking for quality fiction and nonfiction for their mp3 players.

Asimov's In Memory Yet Green autobiography - after a pause I finished the last part yesterday and am looking forward to the second volume!! great stuff, better than I.Asimov.

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:29 pm

Harlan is good with those voices. I think Sybil and Harlan are very close.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:14 am

Jan wrote:Has Harlan ever heard you do one of his?


Sadly, no. Apart from the undoubtedly more authentic Noo Yawk and Joisey accents, I flatter myself that I can read Ellison stories as well -- oh well, all right, ALMOST as well -- as he.

And I'd love to see my Holmes and Watson go head-to-head with Harlan, even in his prime. (His voice is getting a bit worn around the edges these days.)


Jan wrote:If you don't get paid well for your readings, maybe you should send your stuff out or get an agent because you're in the exact right business, everybody's looking for quality fiction and nonfiction for their mp3 players.


Wish I knew how to do that, other than moving to LA, NY or possibly Maryland, where at least one of the biggest audio publishers is located. But agents here in Portland are only interested (and probably able) to refer one to commercial work (i.e., ads for furniture outlets and vision specialists).

I' m hoping to edge further into this area of expertise with some of my current activities.

After my last reading (Jack London at the coffeehouse), a woman said, "I don't know why there isn't a turnout of 2,000 for these!"

And yesterday evening, while I was dining on pasta at a neighborhood restaurant, my nose firmly pressed into the new biography of Warren Zevon, a tall, thin, elderly gentleman came up to introduce himself, said he'd seen my Woody Allen reading at the bank last month and said "You have a very good voice -- the women and everything!"
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby David Loftus » Thu Jun 07, 2007 10:17 am

Anyway, what I'm reading:

1. The League of Frightened Gentlemen - Rex Stout (for book discussion group; we'll be doing a compare-and-contrast with Josephine Tey's The Daughter of Time).

2. I'll Sleep When I'm Dead: The Dirty Life and Times of Warren Zevon - Crystal Zevon (for review in the California Literary Review)

3. Out of Thin Air: Dinosaurs, Birds, and Earth's Ancient Atmosphere -- Peter Ward (same reason; fascinating book but slow going)

4. Taking a break from rereading all the Holmes stories after about 35 or 40
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:43 am

I also try to get my reading done in restaurants, so I can have some time off when I'm home. :-)

Woody Allen has such a distinctive and "known" voice I think it's pretty impossible to do him successfully, except if you tell the audience only afterwards who it was. I think the movies where he used stand-ins for himself, like CELEBRITY didn't quite work for that reason alone. Love him.

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Postby David Loftus » Sun Jun 10, 2007 10:00 am

Jan wrote:I also try to get my reading done in restaurants, so I can have some time off when I'm home. :-)

Woody Allen has such a distinctive and "known" voice I think it's pretty impossible to do him successfully, except if you tell the audience only afterwards who it was. I think the movies where he used stand-ins for himself, like CELEBRITY didn't quite work for that reason alone. Love him.



True, but if you read the pieces from his collections [i]Without Feathers[b][i] and [b][i]Side Effects[b][i], that voice is not so much of a factor. The noir pieces, for instance, "Mr. Big" and "The Whore of Mensa," are deliberately written in more of a Chandler/Bogie voice, and "Viva Vargas" (the one Woody Allen piece I still cannot manage to read without cracking up) can be done with a very UN-Woody Hispanic accent.



War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus


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