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For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Wed Dec 20, 2006 12:11 pm

markabaddon wrote:I once asked my rabbi about the level of violence in the Torah, using both the Fall of Jericho and the destruction of Amalek as examples. His response was that God was not perfect yet. Since I like the rabbi, I declined to bring up the idea of omnipotence and how that factored into his response



One of our eminent local rabbis, a retired Conservative rabbi (though out here in Portland, nearly all the rabbis of every stripe are more liberal than their counterparts almost anywhere else in the U.S., save perhaps for San Fran), remarked that he would not recommend God's behavior in the Torah as an example for others.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Ezra Lb.
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Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Dec 20, 2006 2:40 pm

Mark and other Silver John fans check here

http://www.nightshadebooks.com/book.aspx?bookid=98

for the nice Nightshade Press editions.



It never ceases to amaze me that otherwise sensible adults are so anxious to hold onto the god concept that they rationalize behaviour that would clearly be unacceptable to them in a human sphere.
The stories in the Hebrew Bible about Jahweh are the equivalent of the Iliad and the Odyssey for the Greeks, the Epic of Gilgamesh for the Sumerians, and the Eddas of the Norse, among others.

Zeus spent half his time raping human women and spawning any number of gods and monsters. Nobody ever tried to justify this morally because they're just stories!
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Hathor
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Postby Hathor » Wed Jan 10, 2007 9:01 pm

"The Madams of San Francisco".

Covers Pre-Civil War to the Earthquake ravaged Barbary Coast. Tch. Tch. No royalty meant no Courtesan system either. Dang. :twisted:

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Thu Jan 11, 2007 11:14 am

Oh, boy. I am swamped. Although I'm in play rehearsals almost every night:

I accepted an assignment to review Anne Lamott's new one, Grace (Eventually) for the Oregonian by the end of February, and though I've heard about her for years I've never read her work before, so I'm going to try to work my way through several of her earlier books first. Almost finished with Traveling Mercies, the first of her three collections of "thoughts on faith."

I just turned in a critical review of Let There Be Rock: The Story of AC/DC by Susan Masino, which I read 2-3 weeks ago, to the California Literary Review, which just posted my review of the Niall Ferguson book on Monday. (That took a lot longer to read!)

The next book I want to review for the CalLitRev is Out of Thin Air: Dinosaurs, Birds, and Earth's Ancient Atmosphere, a fascinating theory of how the wildly varying levels of oxygen in the prehistoric Earth atmosphere affected the evolution of dinosaurs and mammals, by Peter Ward, a professor of biology, earth and space studies, and astronomy at the University of Washington. Absorbing book, but not something I can read in small chunks throughout a busy day, so I'm only 58 paqes into it.

Nearly finished with a collection of Edogawa Rampo's stories lent to me by Joe Medina and Jamie Larson of the "Afterhell" audio drama series. Some interesting fantasy/horror stuff, but not really my cuppa.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Sun Jan 14, 2007 1:45 am

Errrr . . . I forgot to mention a couple books I'm reading purely for my own pleasure and interest, but will probably poke through very slowly because I own the copies, and they don't involve writing commitments with deadlines.

The first is a cultural history of masturbation -- a scholarly work published by Zone Books, which I believe is a press associated with MIT, I kid you not -- called Solitary Sex, by Thomas W. Laqueur.

The second is called Seriously Funny, by Gerald Nachman. It's a study of the rebel comedians of the 1950s and 1960s, from Mort Sahl, Stan Freberg, Tom Lehrer, Nichols & May, and Sid Caesar to Lenny Bruce, Dick Gregory, Mel Brooks, The Smothers Brothers, and Bill Cosby. Because the cover design follows the style of the old LP album covers of the time -- faded b&w photo in blue tones, with funky orange type for the title -- I just assumed it was a much older book, but it turns out to be copyright 2003, the author knows some of the subjects personally from way back, he did extensive research and interviews with most of them, and it's acutely written. Most of the chapters are much longer than you'd expect them to be. Really cool book.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:38 pm

How in the world was Bill Cosby a rebel comedian? Unless Jello Pudding was funded by the Black Panthers.

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Postby paul » Sun Jan 14, 2007 4:34 pm

While comics like Red Foxx were hits the 'blue' circuit, Cosby was decidedly non-racial in the tenor of his material. It was all about the everyday things,: football, religion, riding the subway, and he didn't need to curse or draw attention to his color to do it.
I don't know if that was "rebellious" but it made him stand out.
Thanks David. I'm going to the library to look for that read.
The medium is the message.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Mon Jan 15, 2007 12:42 am

FrankChurch wrote:How in the world was Bill Cosby a rebel comedian? Unless Jello Pudding was funded by the Black Panthers.



Paul offers a plausible rationale. I think Cosby was the first black comedian to achieve universal (American appeal), and erase -- however temporarily and contextually -- the color barrier. But I'll tell you what this writer says after I get through that chapter. Could be a while, though -- this is my night-table reading, because if I dared to take it to work I wouldn't do anything else, and right now I have writing commitments to develop, a college interview to schedule and conduct, and monologues to polish for the first meeting of my first-ever acting class tomorrow evening.

I just finished Sid Caesar and Tom Lehrer; Steve Allen is next.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Mon Jan 15, 2007 8:12 am

See, Loftus, I knew you would start talking to me again. Your love is just too deep.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:01 am

FrankChurch wrote:See, Loftus, I knew you would start talking to me again. Your love is just too deep.



No, just correcting your ignorance for the benefit of other posters and lurkers.

This was one of those items that has the potential for enlightening and engaging lots of folks, unlike most of your attempts to provoke a direct response from me.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Duane
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Postby Duane » Mon Jan 15, 2007 2:49 pm

Hey Frank, great to see you recognize the greatness of William F. Buckley in your avatar. I've always enjoyed his books!!

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Mon Jan 15, 2007 3:13 pm

I'm getting really tired of your shit Loftus. My Mom is suicidal and I don't need any more pain. Go fuck off.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Jan 16, 2007 1:07 pm

FrankChurch wrote:I'm getting really tired of your shit Loftus. My Mom is suicidal and I don't need any more pain. Go fuck off.



Be glad to, Frank. and you have my apologies in a hard time.

Maybe if you learned to leave well enough alone -- namely, stop holding forth on how wrong everybody else is (on this board and across the country), which inadvertantly airs your biases and blind spots, and in particular trying to prod me into a response -- you'd stop getting such shit from me and a few others. I get very tired of what comes across as YOUR shit.

You pay very little attention to anything of substance that I have to say, so why keep trying to get a response out of me? I would be delighted if you just ignored me as I've mostly been ignoring you.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Jan 16, 2007 3:41 pm

When was the last time someone here said, "I respect your beliefs, but I just don't agree?" It's usually, "Frank, your so full of shit your head looks like the loo at a Bengali gas station." And you wonder why I strike back. hehe.

Reading Banana Republicans, by Stauber and Rampton, experts on the pr system and modern propaganda. God, the shit in the media is scary. The whole world is scary.

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Hathor
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Postby Hathor » Tue Jan 16, 2007 7:58 pm

My "pulp" spanish for the month are :"Madre Hiena"

(Mother Hyena-Complete with vividly colored cover of said Scary Old Bat looming in the background while a poor farmgirl looks away in despair. Some themes just transcend language. :twisted: )

And "!La Mano De Vengaza!" "Vaquero" ( pulp western) comics rule!

Where else can you see a man dragged by his neck on the back of a horse when no "Hangin' Tree" can be found?

(Of course he LIVED! The bad guys should have quartered him like they would have in England :twisted: )

I figure at this rate I could tackle Pablo Neruda by the time I'm oh, eighty...Then onto the works of Umberto Eco in their original language! :twisted:


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