Whatcha listening to?

For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Sep 10, 2014 10:13 pm

Saw LUCY, about which over in the other thread. The soundtrack was pretty good but the best song was during the closing credits.

From artist approved Bandcamp -

http://saiddeepmixtapes.bandcamp.com/track/gods-whisper
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Tim Raven
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Tim Raven » Sat Sep 20, 2014 9:15 pm

Phantogram - "Fall in Love"
The Replacements - "Talent Show"

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FrankChurch
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby FrankChurch » Sun Sep 21, 2014 12:36 pm

Raven, you listen to symphony music, right?

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FrankChurch
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby FrankChurch » Sat Sep 27, 2014 11:35 am

Question of the day: should symphonies suck up to pop culture to get more young people to join in? I say no, either enjoy the art or go away and gum chew with the other artless pricks.

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Steve Barber
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Steve Barber » Sat Sep 27, 2014 12:31 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Question of the day: should symphonies suck up to pop culture to get more young people to join in? I say no, either enjoy the art or go away and gum chew with the other artless pricks.


I don't see any issues with trying to engage people with a little pop before you hit them with the classics.

It's called "laying bait".
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Steve Evil
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Steve Evil » Sun Sep 28, 2014 12:33 am

A lot of philharmonics would go under if they didn't. . .many already have. :(

Mark Tiedemann
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Sun Sep 28, 2014 7:23 am

While I rather dislike most of the "Symphonic Music of X@#" albums, I have one that is a true masterpiece. Taking a rock band and turning it into pseudoclassical string-heavy "stuff" usually fails because the people doing the transcription either do not understand rock or do not understand symphonic music and it ends up being high-end Muzak. The symphonic Pink Floyd album, however, is an example of doing it right. They disassembled Pink Floyd's music and completely rebuilt it as if it had originally been composed for symphony and the results are kind of amazing. I would not hesitate to use it for a modern orchestra as a way of bringing in audience.

That said, there are many composers doing new work for symphonies all the time, most of which doesn't get heard widely because orchestras feel it necessary to appeal to popular taste and their repertoires are heavy with tried-and-true warhorses. How many times do people need to pay money to go hear a live performance of the Eroica or the Jupiter or The Planets? Well, kids need to hear them, certainly, but let's understand that these are the equivalent of Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band or White Rabbit or Nights In White Satin for orchestras. So there already is a working concept of "pop" music guiding repertoires. Including more contemporary versions is not in any way a corruption. Most film music is basically classical programmatic composition. William's theme from Schindler's List fits well with Barber's Adaggio for Strings. Most people hear a pop tune when they hear the William Tell Overture anyway.

The idea, though, is to use it as a gateway to introduce people to that realm of music, so the repertoire has to be balanced. Our own local orchestra has done a good job of that for decades.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Ezra Lb. » Sun Sep 28, 2014 11:37 pm

As far as Classical music a thing we have here (and I'm sure it's all over at this point) is players moving the performances away from the art houses and into the clubs. A club in Alexandria called IOTA has a monthly Bach & Beer night. It's a revelation to hear such music freed from the tight-assed patina of the culture palaces and in a more informal setting. The audiences and the players love it.
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Steve Barber
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Steve Barber » Mon Sep 29, 2014 9:06 am

I think you introduce the environment first. This is why I love to see the enthusiasm for this sort of thing (Murray Gold and the symphony playing music from Doctor Who):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mPndFvTMrQU

It's obviously not classical music, but it's stylistically similar. Same thing with STAR WARS or the majority of John Williams' soundtracks. Think of it as "classical lite".
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FrankChurch
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:56 pm

Isn't progressive rock symphonic rock?

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Steve Evil
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Steve Evil » Mon Sep 29, 2014 5:03 pm

Some of it. . .


I have no data, but it would not surprise me if the work of Keith Emerson, Yngwie Malmsteen or Luca Turilli lured some listeners into the symphonic realm.

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AndrewR
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby AndrewR » Mon Sep 29, 2014 5:12 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Isn't progressive rock symphonic rock?


Uh, some of it maybe?

Just like other art forms and genres, Prog Rock runs a gamut. For every ELP or Yes, there's Rush. And Rush is hardly what I'd call symphonic even though they are solidly in the genre.

You run into this sort of thing with a lot of genres. Punk ran the gamut too. From the New York Dolls and Television to the Clash. All punk, all different sounds.
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Mark Tiedemann
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Mon Sep 29, 2014 6:37 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Isn't progressive rock symphonic rock?


No.

It can use symphonic techniques, but how is something like Focus symphonic? Progressive rock is rock-based that incorporates other forms---jazz, neoclassical, atonalism, 12-tone, etc---to go in directions rock "normally" wouldn't go. It was an attempt to expand the range and burst the boundaries of what had become very formulaic.

An argument could be made that Sgt Pepper's was progressive rock. So was Pet Sounds.

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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Tue Sep 30, 2014 5:58 am

Thought about this a bit more. Saying prog rock is symphonic rock is like saying classical music is music that uses strings. If you took away the performance and just looked at the score, the thing that matters in both is the composition and theory, not the instruments. That comes in later.

That said, given the technology of instrumentation, a three-piece band could suddenly sound like a full orchestra. I suspect if he were alive today and composing Beethoven would be a prog rocker.

Of course, this leads to another problem with general distinctions, the idea that "classical" music is all the same (because it involves, y'know, orchestras). Mozart and Beethoven were at the vanguard of the prog rock of their day---the Romantics, as distinguished from Classical (which could also be broken down roughly into Baroque and Rococo). Romantic music gave way by the 20th century to neoclassical, which also divided up into different schools, etc etc. There were distinct philosophies to each of these and they distinguished themselves from each other so much so that there were doubtless people in 1926 having exactly the same kinds of arguments as these over what is "good" or "worthwhile" or what will last, etc.

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FinderDoug
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Re: Whatcha listening to?

Postby FinderDoug » Tue Sep 30, 2014 11:20 am

Similar sport, different league as the Symphonic Music of (whomever) is the current proliferation of pop music rendered in the "lullaby" style that has no business being a lullaby. It's a cute idea for rabid fan parents to indoctrinate their children to the music they themselves love, but somehow a lullabye version of "Sunday Bloody Sunday" is an oversimplification on a terrible number of levels. And don't even get me started on the lullaby discs devoted to Prince. "Cream"? Really?

http://www.rockabyebabymusic.com/prince.html


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