Wathcya watchin'?

For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Ezra Lb. » Mon Feb 17, 2014 7:54 pm

Steve Evil wrote:Slowly ploughing through the rest of the Outer Limits collection. Great stuff. But I do wish they labelled the discs more clearly. . .


Yeah I bought the boxed set and I was disappointed in the packaging too. It was like they wanted to capitalize on the popularity of the show but didn't really want to sink any money in the release. That never happens, right? :wink:

The OUTER LIMITS made a big impression on me when I was a kid. I was too young to catch the original run but one of the local Atlanta stations ran it in syndication and I remember watching it on Saturday afternoons. Scared the living shit out of me. It was cool years later to buy the VHS tapes of some of the shows and find out they were actually really good TV. I don't think the best shows of the series have ever really been surpassed.

But Mr Evil, sir, here's the deal. HE is on record, in print, as saying that the second season of the show (it only lasted two) is better than the first. Of course the two shows he wrote for them were in the second season. The general consensus seems to be that DEMON is the best show of the series.

But...the problem is that at the end of the first season Joseph Stefano and his production company had a falling out with the network (ABC?) and while he retained executive producer credits, Stefano and all his folks were forced out and a whole new crew came in and took over the show. The look and feel of the show changed and while it shares the same title and format it might as well be two different shows. The first season was Lovecraftian atmospheric SF/horror and the second (aside from the Ellison shows and a couple others) was pretty much straight up cliche SF.

So since you're watching the show I'm just wondering what you think? (Yeah I know of all the important things in this world to worry about this ain't one of them but I am curious.)
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Lori Koonce » Tue Feb 18, 2014 3:25 pm

I just saw the most mind blowing documentary on Friday. It's called Tim's Vemeer, and I highly recommend it to anyone who has an interest in either art history or the visual arts in general.

Our locwl more vie critic Mick LaSalle did a wonderful review, and for once I agree with him. So, I'm just going to post a link to his Chronicle review. Why try to do better than the best?

http://www.sfgate.com/movies/article/Ti ... 232153.php

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Steve Evil
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Steve Evil » Tue Feb 18, 2014 4:21 pm

Well, I haven't gotten through them all yet, and because the discs are pretty blank, I'm never really sure which season I'm in. I do think I prefer the atmospheric stuff, but as I said, I haven't gotten through them all yet. . .

("Eck" was awesome.)

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Feb 19, 2014 9:40 pm

Hey Lori I saw a trailer for that the other day. Looks very cool. I just hope it's in the theaters long enough for me to get to it. I am a huge Vermeer fan. Every time I make it down to the National Art Museum at the Mall I go by the Vermeer. (And the Rodin sculpture room.)


Steve E I'm doing this from memory (too lazy to go look), but check out

NIGHTMARE

IT CRAWLED OUT OF THE WOODWORK

FUN AND GAMES

and the one with David McCallum and the room upstairs in the dark old mansion with all the clocks.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Lori Koonce » Thu Feb 20, 2014 12:21 pm

Ezra

Then Go! Unless I'm mistsken it is still playing at the Landmark E street Cinema....

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FrankChurch
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby FrankChurch » Thu Feb 20, 2014 4:39 pm

You just told Ezra what to do. :)

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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Moderator » Fri Feb 21, 2014 11:52 am

Frank -- Baiting.

Knock it off.
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Lori Koonce
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Lori Koonce » Fri Feb 21, 2014 12:35 pm

FrankChurch wrote:You just told Ezra what to do. :)


Ah yeah, but with one big difference. He was on record as saying he wanted to do so...

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FrankChurch
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby FrankChurch » Sat Feb 22, 2014 10:22 am

Yes, Barber, Sir.

------------

Odd to see Liam Neeson become a big action star.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Ezra Lb. » Sat Feb 22, 2014 10:42 pm

Lori Koonce wrote:Ezra

Then Go! Unless I'm mistsken it is still playing at the Landmark E street Cinema....


It is and I did. Wow. I loved the flabbergasted art critics at the end. Do I buy it? I would love to see the original Vermeer and the copy side by side. And I wonder if anybody has taken the technology and tried to copy another artist? Even if the original wasn't done that way you can still make an amazing copy using the tools.

We do tend to think of art as genius and inspiration when apparently it is mostly craftsmanship and sheer doggedness.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Lori Koonce » Sun Feb 23, 2014 12:31 pm

Ezra Lb. wrote:
Lori Koonce wrote:Ezra

Then Go! Unless I'm mistsken it is still playing at the Landmark E street Cinema....


It is and I did. Wow. I loved the flabbergasted art critics at the end. Do I buy it? I would love to see the original Vermeer and the copy side by side. And I wonder if anybody has taken the technology and tried to copy another artist? Even if the original wasn't done that way you can still make an amazing copy using the tools.

We do tend to think of art as genius and inspiration when apparently it is mostly craftsmanship and sheer doggedness.


The "sea horse smile" sorta sealed the deal for me. As Tim said, the only reason he didn't make the same mistake was because he was aware of its possibility.

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Chuck Messer
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Chuck Messer » Sun Feb 23, 2014 3:50 pm

I recently re-watched the Giorgio Moroder re-release of Metropolis. There have been those who didn't like the modern score with songs by Bonnnie Taylor, Loverboy, etc. but I think it made film perfect for mid-eighties audiences. Many of those tunes still rock (no pun intended). It showed that silent films could still wield their power over modern audiences. It was also an important step in the process of restoring Lang's film. It brought Metropolis out of relative obscurity and focused attention that it wouldn't have gotten otherwise. It also restored scenes and cleaned up the images and most of all, restored the movie's original plot.

I'd seen it before on 16mm with piano accompaniment. That was fine, but the film had been cut down considerably and left the story disjointed, gave the characters some unbelievable motivations for their actions. The movie made little sense. The Moroder version restored the story line to the point where it made more sense. The character's motivations, especially the scientist/inventor/wizard Rotwang were much more understandable.

Giorgio Moroder showed modern audiences that Metropolis was a major achievement.

Chuck
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FrankChurch
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Feb 24, 2014 10:00 am

Bonnie Tyler, ya mean.

Heavy Metal, another film with awful music.

Mark Tiedemann
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Mon Feb 24, 2014 12:30 pm

I saw Metropolis back in the late 70s at a small local theater where someone (I forget his name) from the Washington University music department performed live on synthesizers as accompaniment. I always thought that would have been the best version, but alas it was never produced for release.

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Steve Evil
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Re: Wathcya watchin'?

Postby Steve Evil » Mon Feb 24, 2014 5:05 pm

FrankChurch wrote:
Heavy Metal, another film with awful music.


Hold your tongue sir! No film with Black Sabbath and Blue Oyster Cult in the soundtrack can be called awful. . .

Hmm. . .

I meant no soundtrack which includes Sabbath and Oyster cult can be called awful. . .


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