Webderland Wine Seminar

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paul
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby paul » Tue Jun 07, 2011 12:57 am

Doug~ You're correct about the MD 'liquor store only' law. The laws are quite strange and seemingly arbitrary. I guess whatever sounded good at the time was made into law. For example: A case of beer is okay to carry out of a store, but everything else must be in a bag, even if it's a six-pack and it has a handle. Another one I remember from hanging out in the park was, you could drink in the park if the can or bottle was covered (not out in the open), but of course, you could be arrested if it were proven that you were publicly intoxicated. Craziness.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Frank~ The nicest thing about the cigar shops in MD was that you could still smoke in them. I hope it's still that way. There's only one store that I know of here in ATX that will let you shop-n-smoke. 'Course the lege also passed a totally ineffectual law banning smoking in bars. Not just restaurants, clubs and bars. That's mostly a don't sniff-don't tell policy most places. 'Course, the hookah hippie joints have their special license, I guess. :wink:
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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Ezra Lb. » Thu Jun 09, 2011 5:11 am

...I thought Ezra lived in Virginia

Nah I jess go down air to shoot muh guns.


While the discussion is branching out and getting ethnic any Sake fans out there?
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

David Silver
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby David Silver » Thu Jun 09, 2011 12:08 pm

Ezra Lb. wrote: While the discussion is branching out and getting ethnic any Sake fans out there?


Know nothing 'bout it, 'cept one time I had a cup, as recommended by a friend who invited me to a wonderful Japanese dinner, and it was very pleasant indeed, but would love to learn much more. Pray tell...can you provide a little primer on sake?
We don't stop playing because we grow old.
We grow old because we stop playing.

-- George Bernard Shaw

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Lori Koonce » Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:02 am

Mr. Silver

Now that I know that the BFF isn't the only Sake drinker in my circle, we'll have to get together and go to Japan Town and have a little Sake and Sushi in one of those little shops!

Just let me know when.

David Silver
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby David Silver » Fri Jun 10, 2011 10:10 pm

Hey Lori, not just sake, I'm actually not that familiar with sushi either. I'm one of those sad souls who goes for the "California roll" and not much else. If you can teach me some things about sushi as well as sake, we'll have to make a date one of these afternoons. Actually, there's a killer sushi place near my home, it's on Taraval around 26th Avenue, where sushi chefs from all over the Bay Area go to learn their trade from the "master". If you want to take the trek to the western outlands of the City, by way of the L Taraval streetcar, I'll buy!
We don't stop playing because we grow old.
We grow old because we stop playing.

-- George Bernard Shaw

Anthony Ravenscroft
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Anthony Ravenscroft » Sat Jun 11, 2011 8:47 am

Sake is pleasant, but I don't go out of my way for it.

There's a nice sushi restaurant in Minneapolis, & back when I had a slightly better income I went through the entire selection of sashimi over three visits. Nothing particularly bad or "weird," despite Middle American preconceptions. The best part of salmon is taking small bites to appreciate the sensation of my teeth cutting through the meat. Abalone? Nice enough, but not worth the price. As gaijin taste-buds are apparently less "refined" than Japanese (we horrify them with the amount of wasabi we use!), I'm totally hooked on smoked eel :shock: & like to start my meal with the "caterpillar roll," made with eel, avocado wrap, fluorescent orange tobiko (flying-fish roe), nori, & cucumber. (This is one best eaten without wasabi or soy sauce.) Almost confectionary in its medley of tastes & textures -- I'd be tempted to pair it with a nice Muscat rather than sake. The masters can get quite inventive in presentation, too, with the roll arriving at your table as a caterpillar with bean-sprout "antennas," or a shrimp or even a dragon!!

http://www.google.com/search?q=%22caterpillar+roll%22&hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=lEQ&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&prmd=ivns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=vH3zTa7GNoz2gAfrmu3GCw&ved=0CBkQsAQ&biw=1121&bih=535

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Ezra Lb. » Sat Jun 11, 2011 3:05 pm

Sake

As long as you realize that I still consider myself an initiate rather than a connoisseur here goes...

It's colloquially described as "rice wine" but it's not made like wine, it's brewed more like beer although there are some differences in the process.

What everybody really wants to know is, how do you tell the good stuff from the rotgut? There are select types of rice that are used with a high starch content. The quality of the sake depends on how much refinement and milling of the rice takes place. The very best sake is refined ("polished") from 50% up to even 70%. This removes the impurities. Lesser brews add alchohol while processing and use additives.

Sake is famously served both hot and chilled. The reason it is served hot is because heating kills the flavor of the additives. It follows that the good stuff should ideally be served chilled to bring out the flavors, some quite subtle. I can testify to the truth of this. if you get it in a restaraunt and it is hot it is probably not the good stuff.

Price is a good indicator of quality. You get what you pay for. However when you get to the good stuff how to distinguish brands without knowing Japanese (which I don't).

Look for the words junmai (really good) or junmai (dai)ginjo (the best quality). Importers are usually but not always helpful in transliterating these words into english characters.

Now a snooty person would know the breweries and rice growing regions in Japan but I haven't got there yet. I did see a bottle one time that had been aged 10 years for $255. Yikes! Too rich for my blood. But you can get a good bottle for $20 to $40. It can be as sweet or dry as any wine and like any other hooch you have to try it and see what you like.

Anybody but me thirsty all of a sudden?
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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FrankChurch
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby FrankChurch » Wed Oct 10, 2012 12:37 pm

Consumer Reports gave Target brand pinot Grigio boxed wine a good review. They also gave Walgreens brand ice cream sandwiches the only great review.

I tend to boycott big boxes, but I will buy quality from anywhere. Those ice cream sandwiches are really good. They go good with lots of wine. ha.


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