Webderland Wine Seminar

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markabaddon
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby markabaddon » Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:34 am

Nah, it comes out at other times, like if I have been spending time with my family in Philly, but this surprised because I was unaware of how I was sounding but EVERYONE assured me that it was very noticeable. Jeez, I throw a couple of "how you's doin'" and eveyone thinks I stepped off the set of the Sopranos.....
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Jul 28, 2010 9:36 pm

you's

:?:

:idea:

Oh yeah, that's what a Yankee says when he means y'all!
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby markabaddon » Thu Aug 05, 2010 11:47 am

Yankee would probably be too broad of a term for you's, it is confined almost exclusively to NYC, NJ and Philly

Had an absolutely tremendous wine this weekend. I have been enjoying Alexander Valley vineyardss for a while, and finally got around to trying their Redemption Zinfandel. Had it with a nice steak on Sunday and it was superb, very complex but really tasty. Now I need to try their Temptation Zin
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby markabaddon » Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:13 pm

With the weather starting to turn a bit chillier lately up here in the Great White North, I had a chance to sample some excellent reds this weekend. The best of them all was a Zinfandel called Three. Great on its own but paired with a good juicy steak and it is to die for!
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Lori Koonce » Tue Sep 07, 2010 9:10 pm

[urlhttp://www.fpwm.com[/url]


Hey Mark

Just thought you'd like to take a look at this. They have a wonderful wine club that will ship anywhere in the nation, and it's like 20 bucks a month to get some seriously good wines. If I remember correctly you can pick between white and red or a combo.

BTW, if you and your good lady ever get to SF, let me know. This isn't the only wine shop/bar and we have some amazing wines.

And if buy by the bottle, they have a really cool rating system so you can get exactally the kind of wine you are looking for.

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby markabaddon » Fri Sep 10, 2010 11:54 am

Thanks for the tip Lori, I will open that link up at home later and take a look at their deals

At some point, Karen & I want to take a trip out to CA to visit wine country, specifically Sonoma or the Russian River Valley, but that will have to wait at least until she has a permanent job and is off her current contract position
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby FinderDoug » Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:42 pm

My honey and I were very lucky last night with a wine flight. Had dinner at The Herbfarm up in the Seattle area. The food was divine, the wine parings very good; but for the cheese course, the proprietor brought out a different dessert flight for each of the people at you six person table. Gratis. And apparently to a specific couple of tables only.

And my honey and I freaked out. Because...

I was given 1/3 of an ounce from their cellared bottle of 1795 Madeira. This is a wine that was corked when Washington was President and the nation was still in it's infancy. There are fewer than 20 bottles left on the planet, and it may be the oldest wine currently available by the glass.

And it was wonderful - great mouth feel, deep notes of caramel but not really sweet; smooth, bright, with a long, long finish. It was but two sips, one for each of us. It was enough. :)

Really, there's nowhere to go but down after the one-two of flavor and history. And seriously, YUM. Thank you note to be written when I get home, because it was a rare and mind-blowingly generous gift.

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby FinderDoug » Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:44 pm

"you table" = "our table" in the above.

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Moderator » Sat Sep 11, 2010 1:57 pm

I'm curious. I wouldn't expect that they would uncork the bottle without someone paying for the portion you didn't get. It has to have a remarkably short shelf-life once opened. Any explanation as to why they selected this particular time to open it?

It sounds utterly brilliant, but it leaves me scratching my head.
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby FinderDoug » Sat Sep 11, 2010 2:29 pm

It was already open.

Apparently, Madeira is the only wine that doesn't deteriorate once opened. Not sure why that is. A quick tour through wikipedia suggests it's the process of making it: "Today, Madeira is noted for its unique winemaking process which involves heating the wine up to temperatures as high as 60 °C (140 °F) for an extended period of time and deliberately exposing the wine to some levels of oxidation. Due to this unique process, Madeira is a very robust wine that can be quite long lived even after being opened." The wine list notes: "The 1795 Terrantez probably all derived from one source originally and was then bought by different people on the island during the 19th century.At some stage it was transferred from cask
into glass demi-johns and thence to bottle. Because the different stockholders treated their holdings in various ways (i.e., held the wine in wood or glass longer or shorter), the flavor of the bottlings vary."

They are "the oldest bottles" in Herbfarm's cellar; they apparently first opened one in 1999 as part of their "Last Supper of the Twentieth Century" dinner. They offer it by the glass - $150 for a third of an ounce, $1,795 for a 5-oz carafe, whole bottle wine list price is $10,000 (it was $6k on the 2005 version of the wine list; they don't say how many bottles they have/had; the 2005 wine list, still findable on line, identify "few bottles now remain"; the 2008 edition is revised to note "as of the summer of 2005, five bottle were known to still exist in the world" - they may hold all five). At the very least, they must have one open and one uncorked if they're still offering the full bottle option. By contrast, they have an 1890 Justino Henriques Boal that's noted "by bottle only" which also suggests when they get down to one, it'll go as a bottle, as opposed to going piecemeal.

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby markabaddon » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:09 am

Whimpering with jealousy as I read about Doug's experience :cry:
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Moderator » Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:44 am

I know.

Somehow that bottle of Two Buck doesn't seem quite so appealing.
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Moderator » Wed Sep 15, 2010 11:46 am

Seriously, Doug.

That's a definite checkmark on your Life LIst.

"Sip 130 year old wine."
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FinderDoug
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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby FinderDoug » Fri Sep 17, 2010 5:31 am

Even before Herbfarm, I was angling towards dessert wines as an area of deeper exploration; the Madeira has only whetted that appetite further. What's funny is I don't know why exactly desserts have come to fascinate me (aside from, well, a life-long interest in dessert as a concept). I'll cop to being part fly; and my journey began with sweeter-nature ice wines, but there's part of me that's past that to great degree, from sugars and light crispness to body, richness, that coat-the-glass unctuousness of a Pedro Ximenez and the long, fascinating finishes of some of the ports I've tried.

Also, with a Madeira, I can cost effectively add a "year of my birth" vintage wine without a) breaking the bank or b) worrying as much about palette-ability when I finally uncork it. I'd hate to open a long-held bottle for my 100th birthday only to discover I have a very well-aged vinegar.

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Re: Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Moderator » Fri Sep 17, 2010 7:17 am

Okay, that being the case, Doug, let me recommend a couple Bridlewood Estate wines.

Their late-season Viognier is a wonderfully concentrated sweet dessert wine with tastes of a variety of fruits, honeysuckle and slightly tart hint of apple. (Their standard Viognier is also something I'd highly recommend.) Likewise, they have a smooth and full Syrah Port that is excellent for sipping post-meal or all on its own. They're both a bit difficult to find, but well worth the effort.

Bridlewood was a really surprising find when we visited the Santa Ynez region a few months ago with our friends from Australia. (Apparently the Australians "didn't know" California is a wine producing region. They were "genuinely surprised" to find we had "some 'decent' wines" which some day might even compete with the Hunter Valley and Barossa regions. Someday.

(My response was unprintable, but included the words "Napa", "Sonoma", and "Bite me" in some sense of that same order.)
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.


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