Webderland Wine Seminar

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Webderland Wine Seminar

Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:11 am

As promised elsewhere, this new thread is to discuss wine. Clearly there's no connection to Harlan given his status as a tee-totaller, but there's obviously a desire for this sort of thing given the number of wine-related posts seen of late.

Let the seminars begin.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:30 am

And actually, I'll start things off with a very cool recommendation. At Costco I picked up several bottles of 7 Deadly Zins. It's a low priced off brand from Lodi Vineyards, but damn if it isn't really smooth and drinkable.

This isn't an "impress your friends" wine, it's a "sit down, relax and solve the problems of the world" wine meant for friendly consumption around the campfire, picnic table or firepit.
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Postby Davey C » Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:03 am

Heh. That's even available Out Here Among The Cows, and I found it unexpectedly yummy too. I forget the name of the guy who does the label art -- same one that illustrated Hunter Thompson books...?

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:08 am

Davey - I think you're thinking of Cardinal Zin from the Bonny Doon Vineyards -- which is an excellent wine but a bit more expensive than is 7 Deadly. The artist you're thinking of is Ralph Steadman, who does a good portion of the Bonny Doon labels.
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Postby Davey C » Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:25 am

I FEEL LIKE SUCH A DICK NOW. You're perfectly correct of course; I got those mixed up.

There was a stretch of a couple years, backalong, where it seemed my wife was making wine selections entirely based on the label art. Then she got a grant to do some archive work at the Basilique de Saint-Denis in Paris, and wooho, I got to go join her for a week, during which we discovered that a plain ol' no-name three-euro grocery store bottle of Côtes du Rhône there was better than anything we'd ever tried here, and turned into wine-snob wannabes upon our return.

(Well, SHE did -- I enjoy wine the way I enjoy movies: if it's in front of me, I like it -- but I can fake a discerning palate in one of those all-too-frequent Discerning Palate Crises that arise so often in my life & lifestyle.)

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Postby Davey C » Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:35 am

Gah -- I keep forgetting, as I post & post & post, to throw out Bigge Proppes to Wisconsin's Wollersheim Winery, up in Prairie du Sac (about 20 miles northwest of Madtown). My goodness motherfuckin gracious, don't they put up some fabulous wines? I'll shout it from the rooftops.

Most assuredly worth an if-you're-in-the-neighborhood jaunt.

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Postby Davey C » Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:40 am

Christ -- ignore that 'the' right before "Wisconsin's". Despite perfectly sound reasons for the prohibition, I nonetheless HATE not being able to edit my posts. It won't be such an issue once I getter better at typing with my fuckin' forehead, but.

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 21, 2008 12:08 pm

"The" deleted. Wisconsin is no longer like "The" Ukraine.

Well, Ukraine is no longer "The" Ukraine either, but...
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Postby FrankChurch » Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:33 pm

I'm not an expert, but is French wine still considered the best?

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:48 pm

FrankChurch wrote:I'm not an expert, but is French wine still considered the best?


It is ... by the French. 8)
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Postby markabaddon » Mon Apr 21, 2008 9:39 pm

Had 7 Deadly Zin this weekend. A local liquor store had their twice a year sale and they were selling the wine for about $8, which is an absurdly low price as it normally lists for about $18-20. Turned out to be a split bottle, but still not a bad price. I like the wine a lot and would recommend it.

Had another Zin this weekend (hell, was only able to get just over a glass out of the 7 Deadly Zin bottle after splitting it with my lady), one of my favorites, an old vine Zin from the Bogle Vineyard. I have been getting into some of these old vine Zins, as they have a very complex, but very drinkable flavor to them.
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BOGLE

Postby Peggy » Tue Apr 22, 2008 7:31 am

Bogle is one I consider a reliable (upper end of low tier or bottom end of mid tier depending on your viewpoint) producer, and always a value for their prices. Their petite sirah is a bargain at $13-15 (last time I bought it) and their chardonnay picks up a number of tropical fruit notes which few Cali chards can pull off in their price range.

Long as we're in the B's, Bonterra also tends to be a good value, plus they're organic to boot. I've had their zin and chard, both decent bottles.

Nice thing is these are easy wines to find....
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Postby swp » Tue Apr 22, 2008 8:01 am

I like Kreuznacher, a German wine from Bad Kreuznach in the Nahe valley region. The Reisling, Silvaner and Müller-Thurgau varieties are excellent most years, with truly outstanding ones at least once or twice each decade. They make good beer too...
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that reminds me of a funny story....

Postby Peggy » Tue Apr 22, 2008 9:35 am

...in which I pulled off the winning guess in a blind tasting against a dozen or so more experienced and savvy palates than my own. This was probably 10-12 years ago, at which point I'd really only been learning about wine activitely for 3-4 years, although drinking it for much longer.

Our wine crowd gathered at the Corsair in Anchorage. This was a very nice restaurant with an award winning wine list, and they did weekly wine tastings on Tuesdays. We got the bulk of our education on wine here; you might say we matriculated. :wink: Our instructors were the savvy bartender Andy, who had 20+ years behind the bar at this oenophilic restaurant; the local distributor Larissa, who often presented the tasting; the owner Hans, who complied the award winning collection; and the wide ranging crowd of regulars, connesieurs of varying degree, some of whose only big spending habit was wine. It's where we learned what the terms meant, what each was like on our own palettes, which we enjoyed, which we didn't. We graduated to greater breadth and higher spending. 8)

The regulars would often hang around after the tasting to play "the game" at which point one of the gang would plunk down for a bottle, it would be decanted in the back and brought out, glasses poured and passed 'round, and guesses made. The winner took home admiration, pride, and we all got to have a glass or two of some very decent stuff. (One and only time I've ever had Penfolds Grange. :D )

In this particular instance, the owner got in on the action and decided to try and throw everyone for a loop. He brought out a bottle of red, vibrant color between cranberry and eggplant. It was full of fruit, hardly any touch of oak, bowl of berries and cherries in the bouquet, but definitely not of the familiar varieties. Mouthfuls were swished and swallowed, glasses sniffed, brows furrowed through the finish in discernment. Shaky guesses were thrown out, most in the caveat of 'I know this isn't it but....".

I ususally didn't speak up during the game. For one, I was, and continue to be, absymally bad at guessing the grape. :lol: Love wine, know my palette, but the palette ain't savvy. Also, as a relative novice compared to most of the crowd, I was always interested to hear what they guess and why.

On this occasion though, I recognized the wine instantly. I've no poker face so it was obvious as soon as it occurred to me. "I know it," I said. There were a number of surprised looks of course, given my usual tendencies. There were murmurs and nods of encouragement to reveal my guess, with undoubtedly some expectation it would be, as per my norm, woefully wrong.

I laid it out short and sweet. The owner flashed a large, surprised smile, confirmed my answer, and the rest looked on astonished. Of course I was asked how I knew... I explained I recognized it only because I'd gone on a drunk at home with the particular grape some 4-6 years early. Only time I ever deliberately got drunk to drown my sorrows, which made it a memorable event and of course, an unforgettable flavor. :P

The wine? German Lemberger, one of the few reds produced in the country, and to this day I've never seen an actual export.; Spatburgunder (German produced Pinot Noir), yes, but not Lemberger. In this case the owner had pulled a bottle from his private stash and since it's rarely made in the states (there used to be one or two wineries in Washington State that produced it, one was Kiona), he figured none of us would have a hope of recognizing it.

True story. And by the way, Lemberger is a great thanksgiving wine....
"And if you're like me, you need hope, coffee and melody..." - Robbie Seay Band, "New Day"

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no matter how many times I hit preview

Postby Peggy » Tue Apr 22, 2008 9:46 am

*sigh*

never have I wished for an edit function more...
"And if you're like me, you need hope, coffee and melody..." - Robbie Seay Band, "New Day"


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