Comics. What are they good for?

For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Mon Jul 03, 2006 2:27 pm

Other than 52 (and I am still trying to figure out who that giant dude is that caught Starfire, he looks very familiar but I cannot place it), the ones I am really enjoying are:

Secret Six and Birds of Prey - primarily because of Gail Simone, the lady is a dynamite writer

Shadowpact - I loved the team interactions during Day of Vengeance, and the premise on which this series has started intrigues me, both from the massacre they are trying to avoid and the twist of them being locked inside this impenetrable bubble for over a year

I am curious, did you pick up the 198 and, if so, what were your thoughts? As I stated earlier, I was enjoying the series immensely until the end, when an obscure character is able to take down a massively powered mutant seemingly without effort.

Also, I am not sure what the purpose of the series was supposed to be. At first, I thought it would be to highlight the injustice of segregating a segment of the population without any due cause, but that angle was pretty much dropped completely.

I was also following the X Men: The End very closely, as I greatly enjoyed Phoenix: Endsong. X Men: The End is a story of much broader scope and tries to resolve some long standing mysteries within the X Men universe, but ultimately ends up being overly complex and contradictory. Characters are killed off for no reason other than shock value, and some villains who had proven to be very dangerous in the past are killed off with ridiculous ease.
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Postby Adam-Troy » Mon Jul 03, 2006 2:35 pm

Sorry. Wasn't following 198.

I had serious geek-love for the latest issue of ASTONISHING X-MEN, as written by Joss Whedon, wherein (among things) Wolverine gets a nice psychic brainwashing and is skipping around with the personality of a goopy five-year-old girl. Also the last page, where Kitty Pryde snarls, "It's MY turn," aping a famous shot involving Logan from the Claremont / Byrne years; I can't wait to see that much-maligned "weakest" member of the X-Men kick ass.

Other faves: Y: THE LAST MAN; KEV; as you say, BIRDS OF PREY (yeah, she can write!), anything done by Paul Chadwick, anything by Mark Millar (I loved WANTED). I will be reading Brubaker's CRIMINAL and Grant Morrison's BATMAN; in both cases I follow the creator, not the character.
Coming in 2007: THE SHALLOW END OF THE POOL! Plus THE UNAUTHORIZED HARRY POTTER (Ben Bella Books).

Coming in 2008: EMISSARIES FROM THE DEAD!

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Mon Jul 03, 2006 2:54 pm

While I am a devotee of the cult of Joss, this latest run in Astonishing is lacking for me.

I enjoyed the first 12 issues, but after their hiatus the series seemed to lose steam. I do enjoy the explanation for Emma's secondary mutation, as well as her "road to Damascus" moment, but somehow it feels out of place with the way the character has been portrayed since she became an X Man.

The last shot of Kitty in the latest issue is a fun nod to the iconic Byrne shot of Wolverine but she just does not have the same amount of menace as Logan. Kitty is a very skilled fighter, and can be deadly, especially when using her phasing ability during combat, but she ain't Wolverine, and it is silly to represent her as such.
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Fri Jul 14, 2006 2:25 pm

Just picked up issue #2 of Secret Six (this series spun out of the Villains United mini-series) and I would highly recommend any and all comic book fans to check it out.

The comic begins with a very graphic torture sequence, moves to a difficult moral choice by the torturer, and then segues into an unusual confrontation between a mother and father over custody issues. To say more would spoil the story, but this is a very well written, adult oriented comic that is starting out in a very promising fashion.
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Fri Jul 14, 2006 3:07 pm

Well, it seems, nowadays, comics are merely used as props to make easy cash. Prices for older comics are outragious.

Reading and enjoyment always take a backseat to economics.

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Sat Jul 15, 2006 10:33 am

Just got back from X-Men III and adored it. But then again, I never really read the comics, and knew more than a couple fans who were incensed by the previous installment.

(Of course, here I am again arriving late at the discussions. . .)

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Hathor
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Postby Hathor » Mon Jul 24, 2006 6:33 pm

I'd say comics are good if you want to try to improve your fluency in another language, but "CONDORITO" really tested that theory, boy...

My literacy in Spanish is about non-existent. It took me nearly a month to read a "pulp" western. I got lucky, because it was well worth it. When the banditos were trying the throw the hapless widow off her ranch before she was arrested, she went off in this tirade where she declared she gave birth to all of her children there,
( i have to stop here, because in the context of telling off the villians I couldn't tell if she was in such a rage that she said would have pulled off their umblical cords with her teeth, or that she HAD :( )

and she was only leaving if they'd kill her first. Still, I had to read the passages over again, and this was only about 100 pages long huge margins, etc.
So I decided to try something less..umm..INVOLVED...
:?: :?: "Condorito" is a Mexican "Barney".

"Condorito" is the basest definition of pornography where it serves no useful purpose and the images disturb you afterward.

The idea I had to struggle SO HARD to grasp jokes THAT LAME...I swear, if they don' t have Anti-"Condorito" sites out there, I'll MAKE one... :evil: :evil:

Luckily, I found the "Adult" Comics.. "!TERROR EN EL CIELO!" covered the Space Programs, and "!PARADISIO EN EL NUDISTA!" um..well...Oh, come on!!!!

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Ezra Lb.
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Postby Ezra Lb. » Tue Jul 25, 2006 7:09 am

FrankChurch wrote

Reading and enjoyment always take a backseat to economics.

Brilliant, FC, brilliant! You've just summed all of Karl Marx and most Leftist/Socialist thought for the last one hundred and fifity years.


A comic version of A SCANNER DARKLY has just been published that uses frames from the film as panels. This is the graphic version of the "novelization" tie-in I suppose. I have nothing against a good comic but it's a shame to give people even more of an incentive not to attempt to read Dick's beautiful sad book.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

rich

Postby rich » Tue Jul 25, 2006 7:56 am

Ezra Lb. wrote:A comic version of A SCANNER DARKLY has just been published that uses frames from the film as panels. This is the graphic version of the "novelization" tie-in I suppose. I have nothing against a good comic but it's a shame to give people even more of an incentive not to attempt to read Dick's beautiful sad book.


Or, maybe it'll give some people an incentive to attempt to read the book. I know when I read comics, if something interested me I'd check out more stuff by the writer, or even the subject. Then again, I'm an unattractive bookworm, with a curious intelligence so what the fuck else was I gonna do? Get on the football team and date cheerleaders? Maybe in my next life.

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Wed Jul 26, 2006 11:24 am

Gotta say I agree with Rich on this one. Any publicity is good publicity, if someone picks up the comic version and likes it, they are more inclined to buy the original version.

Football team? Cheerleaders? A Jedi (or an Ellison groupie) desires not these things.....
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

rich

Postby rich » Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:03 pm

Oh, don't get me wrong. I desire 'em. Well, not the football team. But the cheerleaders...especially that cute one with the long dark hair and those pom-poms. She's got my vote.

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Clayton_George
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Postby Clayton_George » Thu Jul 27, 2006 10:42 am

...what are comics good for? Well, apart from manic brain exercise like "Those Annoying Post Brothers" and other fun insanity, the main thing comics are good for is bringing comic fans together in comic book stores. The more often we can actually get together and talk face to face, instead of chatting on line, the better. 8)

Ace_Arn
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Postby Ace_Arn » Wed Aug 09, 2006 6:21 pm

I have never had a conversation with a stranger in a comic book store. Tried, yes, but succeded no. (Except with store owners.) And I've never seen 2 random comic fans, complete strangers to each other, spark up a conversation either. Even eye contact and a nod is difficult to get. There's almost an aura of shame in the shops I go to; nerd self-loathing. So everyone is quiet as a mouse.

In the record shops I frequent however, it's not hard at all to get a conversation going.

Direct corrolation between the medium collected and a person's social comfort zone?

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Michael D. Blum
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Postby Michael D. Blum » Wed Aug 09, 2006 10:07 pm

I wouldn't say so, Ace - the comic shop I work in is a very family-friendly place, well-lit and inviting, and strangers end up having endless conversations, even to the point of me wanting them to shut up and leave (after an hour of fanboy discussion about Wolverine's latest zit). The boss and I make sure that everyone feels welcome (including women, which is apparently rare in comic book shops), and snotty/nasty people are told that their behavior is unappreciated. There are also two other shops here in town that have a very open atmosphere. I think it all depends on the owner.
"When you're on stage, it's not about being judged - it's all about trying to say something that you really need to say."
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Ace_Arn
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Postby Ace_Arn » Wed Aug 09, 2006 11:55 pm

Well I guess it's just a regional phenomenon then. Glad to hear your store has a better social scene.


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