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rich

Postby rich » Mon Jan 21, 2008 3:56 pm

markabaddon wrote:I am really enjoying The Historian. Possibly one of the most original Dracula stories I have ever read, and I have read a ton of them


You should check out The Secret Life of Laszlo, Count Dracula, by Roderick Anscombe, if you haven't already. It's been awhile since I've read it, but I remember liking it and it was a nice "rational" take on the legend.

Meanwhile I'm kicking myself that I didn't pick up Twilight, by William Gay, when I saw it in that bookstore in Nashville. Now I can't find the damn thing anywhere.

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Postby Moderator » Wed Feb 06, 2008 3:19 pm

I just completed Dan Simmons' THE TERROR.

Long, a bit repetitive at times (to make sure you haven't forgotten some pertinent trivia mentioned earlier in the novel), but on the whole an extraordinary read.

(I told my wife it was the best mythological revisionist-history maritime fantasy-horror esquimaux (eskimo) novel I've read in a long, long time.)
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Postby FrankChurch » Wed Feb 06, 2008 7:17 pm

Come on Barber, let's see a smile.

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Postby Steve Evil » Wed Feb 06, 2008 8:22 pm

Finally finished The Subtle Knife by Phillip Pullman. On the whole, I'm not quite as impressed as with The Golden Compass, but man, what a cliff hanger ending! Anxiously starting the next one. . .

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Postby Ezra Lb. » Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:34 am

Mr Barber wrote about Dan Simmons' THE TERROR

I told my wife it was the best mythological revisionist-history maritime fantasy-horror esquimaux (eskimo) novel I've read in a long, long time.

I've had that big fat sumbitch on my shelf since Christmas, skittish about biting off such a big chunk. But your description did the trick...it's next.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Thu Feb 07, 2008 9:47 am

Steve Evil wrote:Finally finished The Subtle Knife by Phillip Pullman. On the whole, I'm not quite as impressed as with The Golden Compass, but man, what a cliff hanger ending! Anxiously starting the next one. . .


Hmm. I preferred the second book -- even over the third. The revelation of the alternate worlds, the traveling between them, a second protagonist (male) to join the first . . . what's not to like?

But all three are fabulous. Wait'll you get a load of the limbo or purgatory or whateverthehell it was in the third book.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Thu Feb 07, 2008 11:22 am

Last thing I finished was The Sun also Rises. Just about the most unpretentious book I've ever read, but too much based on observation, for my taste. I'm reading his letters. (Also Thomas Mann's letters.)

I'm also reading the Acme Novelty Library 18 portion by portion.

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Postby David Loftus » Thu Feb 07, 2008 12:43 pm

Meanwhile, I'm plowing through Jeffrey Toobin's The Nine (for my book group), James McBride's Song Yet Sung (for review in the Oregonian), and Richard Powers's The Echo-Maker (for me, and because Powers is coming to town to speak in four weeks).

All terrific, though the Powers seems a little less ambitious and complex than some of his others. Yet this is the one that won the National Book Award. I would have given it to four or five of his earlier books over this one. It was long past time for him to get one.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby Steve Evil » Thu Feb 07, 2008 9:50 pm

Make no mistake David, I highly enjoyed the second book, it just took me longer to get into. I found in the first half there was alot of jumping around and a rush to introduce new concepts and characters, while I was getting impatient to find out about the old concepts and characters. But it was certainly great once it got going, and I can't wait to start the third. But I gottta finish Ali's Fear of Mirrors first.

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Postby FrankChurch » Fri Feb 08, 2008 2:32 pm

David Cay Johnson, Free Lunch. Taxes are rigged to help the rich, be afraid.

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Postby Jan » Fri Feb 08, 2008 4:32 pm

Frank, have you ever read anything apolitical?

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Postby David Loftus » Sun Feb 10, 2008 11:16 pm

Finished McBride's Song Yet Sung. Liked it very much. Will give it a warm review in the Oregonian. Ya gotta resent a guy who can have TWO creative careers at the same time (jazz composer/musician and writer). He just did his first screenplay -- of his second novel, Miracle at St. Anna, which I liked a lot, too -- which Spike Lee shot last October in Tuscany with supporting cast that includes James Gandolfini and John Turturro.

I must be punchy. I'm enjoying everything I'm reading, but I can't stay focused on one thing for very long (more than an hour or so). Thus, I find myself on p. 164 of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, page 109 of Christopher Hitchens's God is Not Great, page 47 of John Barton's Playing Shakespeare, and two tales into Borges's The Aleph and Other Stories.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby FrankChurch » Mon Feb 11, 2008 3:47 pm

Jan, not for about a year, to be honest. I do need to get back to fiction. The fictional world being safer and all.

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Chuck Messer
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Postby Chuck Messer » Mon Feb 11, 2008 4:15 pm

That depends on the writer, Frank my lad. There are many that are considered threatening enough to ban.

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Some people are wedded to their ideology the way nuns are wed to God.

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Postby FrankChurch » Mon Feb 11, 2008 5:36 pm

Recently it has been nonfiction books that have been banned. Chomsky's Economy Of Human Rights was pulped because Warner Books CEO didn't like its conclusions.


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