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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Wed Feb 21, 2007 1:27 pm

Maybe I'm not working hard enough and subconciously trying to compensate, but it's all "serious" stuff this week. <i>The Portable Chekhov, Short stories of Guy de Maupassant</i> and Hemmingway's <i> For Whom the Bell Tolls</i>.

Blow up the friggin' bridge already!

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:44 pm

A Devil's Chaplain by Richard Dawkins and AC-DC: Maximum Rock & Roll by Murray Engleheart and Arnaud Durieux.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Fri Mar 16, 2007 12:33 pm

This is my first Dawkins. (Seems like I tried to crack The Selfish Gene many years ago and didn't get anywhere with it.) I had been meaning to read him for a long time, because by reputation he sounded a lot like Alan Dershowitz -- a guy fighting the good fight in ways that might be counter-productive, through methods that make many allies and potential allies uncomfortable.

So far, I've found that, again like Dershowitz, Dawkins is much more congenial and sensible on the page than in the media.

Aside from the usual stuff about evolutionary biology, his mentors and colleagues (from Medawar to Stephen Jay Gould), and the odd essay about the jury system or cloning, this particular collection has a bit of a surprise that might appeal to HE fans: a couple essays on Douglas Adams -- one a growl of rage written within 24 hours of his death, the other a much lovelier and funnier piece that was delivered as a eulogy at Adams's funeral.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

Carstonio
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Postby Carstonio » Fri Mar 16, 2007 1:54 pm

Recent books I've read:

The End of Faith by Sam Harris

The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins

Where Did Our Love Go by Nelson George

Motown: Music, Money, Sex and Power by Gerald Posner

Dancing in the Street: Confessions of a Motown Diva by Martha Reeves

Mercy, Mercy Me: The Art, Loves and Demons of Marvin Gaye by Michael Eric Dyson

Tight by Patrick Sanchez, a D.C. author who was one of my wife's classmates in high school

Spider Kiss, for the third time

Next up is Finn by Jon Clinch

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Fri Mar 16, 2007 4:18 pm

the Bridge is blown! Hurrah! But does he shoot Lieutenant Berrendo? Damnit, I want to know!!!

Not sure what to do next. Molierre's <i>The Misanthrope</i> the Short stories of Guy de Maupassant, <i>The Bradburry Reader, I'm an English Major, Now What?</i> and <i>Everything About Theatre</i> are all under my bed.

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:22 pm

Steve, I am a huge fan of Moliere's so I wuld recommend Le Misanthrope (and Tartuffe for a compliemntary piece)
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Fri Mar 16, 2007 7:22 pm

Steve, I am a huge fan of Moliere's so I wuld recommend Le Misanthrope (and Tartuffe for a compliemntary piece)
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Postby BrianSiano » Fri Mar 16, 2007 8:49 pm

I'm halfway into _Things I Didn;t Know_, Robert Hughes' memoir.

About 60% into _Against the day_, which is grinding me down quickly. I'm thinking of bagging it and trying again later.
"Everything... Everything... Everything gonna be all RIGHT this mornin'..."
-- Muddy Waters

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Postby Moderator » Tue Apr 03, 2007 11:08 am

I finished, two days ago, Michael Crichton's NEXT.

My only question is *why* I finished, two days ago, Michael Crichton's NEXT.
________________________________

Side note:

This weekend I was rearranging some of my books and ran across the Asimov-edited Where Do We Go From Here? -- one of the most underrated collections in the SF genre, IMHO.

Is anyone else familiar with this book? Wonderful science-based stories such as Don A Stuart's NIGHT, Heinlein's AND HE BUILT A CROOKED HOUSE, Jerome Bixby's hysterical THE HOLES AROUND MARS and James Blish's SURFACE TENSION.

(WDWGFH?, along with Asimov's two Hugo Winners... volumes, and Ellison's two DV collections, comprised much of my early SF (and "just-plain", f'r that matter) reading.)
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Davey C
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Postby Davey C » Tue Apr 03, 2007 11:37 am

WDWGFH is one of my All Time Favorite Anthologies Ever. I've rescued it five or six times from wife/girlfriend cleaning frenzies.

LOVE IT? I'LL SHOUT IT FROM THE ROOFTOPS! It would be one of the half-dozen books I'd grab on my way to a life-sentence on a desert island.
aaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAAAAUUUUUUUUUGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!! My nipples!

-Bob Goldthwait

paul
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Postby paul » Tue Apr 03, 2007 11:57 am

RE: Crichton~ Steve, i know the feeling. Harlan once described reading Kahlil Gibran as "...like eating cotton candy, and just as filling." I enjoy some of his books, but when i'm done, i'm not full of much of anything.
That having been said, I love x12 SPHERE. I know, i know. I cannot help myself. Maybe it's my sweet tooth.
---------------------------------------------
Davey, i love your current quote. There are very few who own or have even read CRUEL SHOES. Big thumbs up from here. An ex made me a stenciled t-shirt that simply said Oh ducks, Oh ducks, Oh ducks.
You can imagine how many times i had to explain that. And even after i did, they still didn't get it, natch.
The medium is the message.

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Davey C
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Postby Davey C » Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:13 pm

HA! I help people who seem to be having trouble finding a word or ending a sentence with:"...my God...THE LOST MONET!"
aaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAAAAUUUUUUUUUGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!! My nipples!



-Bob Goldthwait

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Tue Apr 03, 2007 2:16 pm

Tried to read Congo back in high school. Thought it was dumb.

In other news, Misanthrope is full of some great zingers.

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Postby Moderator » Tue Apr 03, 2007 2:47 pm

I'm roughly a third of the way through Dean Koontz' Life Expectancy.
So far, much more fun than anything Crichton's done. I get the impression Koontz was having a tongue-in-cheek blast writing this one...
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Latest reading...

Postby Laurie » Tue Apr 03, 2007 3:40 pm

I am currently reading Dreamcatcher by Stephen King. Just finished Gerald's Game. I'm also busy rereading many of HE's stories that I have not read in at least 15 or more years.

This last summer I had the pleasure of reading the book I am recommending, especially for those who enjoy American history:

Ethan Allen
by Stewart Holbrook

Mr. Holbrook was known as a history writer, mostly non-fiction. This is a biography of Ethan Allen written with verve and real love for this lively historical figure. Ethan Allen is one of the almost forgotten men of American history and you'll find out why when you read his biography. He was considered radical in the extreme in his day and his radical image still holds up pretty well. In Vermont, the state he founded, not one highway or school or public building is named for him. He wrote a book on religion (he was a deist) that made the president of Yale University faint. You gotta love that. In some ways, he reminds me just a bit of HE, irreverent, profane, honest, original, tough, brave, witty, literate and always his own man. Holbrook's love for what he calls Allen's "hearty, defiant unregenerate soul" shines through this biography.


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