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For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

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Hathor
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Postby Hathor » Tue Apr 03, 2007 4:59 pm

"The Castle In The Forest", by Norman Mailer. The devil made Hitler do it. :( :x :evil: :( :evil: :evil: :roll: :evil: **HUH?**

And G-D knows I wouldn't dope-slap anyone under 30 if their nasty behavior is all they know, nor would I call out an 84 year old man, just on general principle. (mumble-grumble USELESS ARCHAIC ETHICS**[i]ulcer flare**[b]CULTURAL ICON seethe seethe fester sheer jealous envy) :wink:

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Apr 03, 2007 10:47 pm

Hathor wrote:"The Castle In The Forest", by Norman Mailer.



Is that a new one? I've never heard of it.

(I haven't read a lot of Mailer, either, but I know most of the titles.)
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

Carstonio
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Postby Carstonio » Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:16 am

Hannibal Rising by Thomas Harris - I'm a fourth of the way into the book and I think I know what the ending will be.

Born on a Blue Day by Daniel Tammet, who is a savant with Asperger's syndrome. I find his life story fascinating, partly because his social experiences growing up were a lot like mine, and partly because of his extraordinary abilities with numbers.

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Davey C
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Postby Davey C » Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:27 am

Where Do We Go From Here?

Again.

I blame Barber.
aaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAAAAUUUUUUUUUGGGGGHHHHHHHH!!! My nipples!

-Bob Goldthwait

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Postby Moderator » Wed Apr 04, 2007 9:38 am

Hey, at least it isn't NEXT.

(For that, I would genuinely burn in Hell.)


(And, honestly, youse other guys need to pick it up if you haven't read it yet. Bitchin' collection. It'll kick yer backside. Listen to Davey n me. Do it. Do it now.)
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Fri Apr 06, 2007 1:00 pm

Yea, I tried to understand what Mailer was getting at, when listening to an interview about that new book. It would have been more controversial and interesting if God would have nudged Hitler, not thee debbell.

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Postby Carstonio » Mon Apr 09, 2007 7:15 am

Dream Corridor 2 just arrived. I liked the image of Harlan playing poker with the other notables, especially Dorothy Parker who was instrumental in establishing Harlan's reputation.

My only criticism was Hemingway - he didn't look haunted enough for me. Years ago, I saw some 1930s pictures of Hemingway displayed at one of his haunts in Bimini. The look on his face was chilling, like he might have been thinking about suicide even then. I don't know much about Hemingway's early life, but I immediately pictured him as being emotionally and physically abused by his parents, like he was desperate to prove to his father that he was a "real man."

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Mon Apr 09, 2007 7:52 am

I opened a thread for the new Dream Corridor in the S.P.I.D.E.R section. Haven't discovered Hemingway yet.

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 09, 2007 9:08 am

Jan wrote:I opened a thread for the new Dream Corridor in the S.P.I.D.E.R section. Haven't discovered Hemingway yet.


I'll check out the new thread.

Jan. Whatever you do, don't pass from this green earth without reading The Hills Like White Elephants. It's a short story, so not a huge investment of time, but it's one of (IMHO) Hemingway's best -- which is saying A LOT. There are layers upon layers upon layers in that story.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Hathor
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Postby Hathor » Thu Apr 12, 2007 1:36 pm

Frank:
There is no devil. Just G-D after he's smoked crack :twisted:

So what kind of djinn whispered in Saddam's ear? Or Pol Pot's?
Idi Amin's? (Wait... do I really want to go there...?)

Mailer should stick to his ruminations and rants about Marilyn Monroe being the one that got away.

Personally, I'd find it refreshing if I'd met an evil-doer who'd twirl their Snidely Whiplash mustache and explain his plot to destroy everything good and kind in the world. But then I'd have no inspiration...

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Postby KristinRuhle » Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:57 pm

Well, Harlan gave me DC Vol 2 for free "because I had her baby" he announces in public...well he thinks I'm his champion or something, for seeking out the truth about a local convention and the fannish rumors about him! (Which scares me to death, because I'm really a wuss. But I will not CONTRIBUTE to the bad rumors.....though I doubt I can change anyone's opinion of HE.) Anyway, I read that (partly on the plane on my way home!) So that would count.

The book I had with me at Pink's is George MacDonald Fraser's THE STEEL BONNETS, about 16th-century Anglo-Scottish border reivers (cattle raiders.) Richard Nixon was descended from them! And LBJ! And Billy Graham! And Neil Armstrong! Fraser's mostly known in the UK as a novelist, and if you Brits out there tell me he's a total hack I'll believe you (he's churned out a lot of books that sound, from the descriptions I've seen, like historical potboilers) but this one is nonfiction and I find it interesting. note: it was published in 1971, the author fought in ww2, so he'e either dead now or very old...I found the copy (a UK edition) in a pile of books that had been donated to a charity for prisoners to read in jail, of all things, and I should give it back, though they may never miss it.

I also have THE ELECTRIC KOOL-AID ACID TEST by Tom Wolfe...a real classic and probably the one I *should* have traveled with.

Some books (such as the latest by Carl Hiassen) I'm still waiting for the paperback editions of. I might get the new Greg Bear novel which is just about to be released in the US (it came out in the UK first!) since I know the author just well enough he always calls me by my first name and I need to read at least one hard-sf novel a year or two to remind me of my Asimov-fan roots.....(I grew up on Asimov's nonfiction kids books and learned half of what I know about science from them!)

Kristin

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Mon Apr 23, 2007 1:25 pm

Especially Asimov's books about the old and new Testaments. Must reads for all skeptics, or people in line with Satan like me.

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 30, 2007 2:42 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Especially Asimov's books about the old and new Testaments. Must reads for all skeptics, or people in line with Satan like me.


I'd like a copy for my Fundamentalist friend, please. I'm still reeling from his Saturday-past "we come from the Garden of Eden"/"The fossil record is a fraud" revelation...
________________________________________

Book Club Report: I just finished a rereading of Vonnegut's Cats Cradle and a coupld of weeks ago finished Dean Koontz' Life Expectancy.

Currently spot-reading the aforementioned Where Do We Go From Here, (yes, I caused my own self to pick it up again).

Cat's Cradle is still not my favorite Vonnegut. It doesn't flow naturally like so many of his other books. I found myself having that slogging sensation, but maybe that's because I knew the ending...

Life Expectancy is a really fun read. This has got to be one of Koontz' most under-rated books.

Also, page by damned page, I'm working on Ralph Steadman's The Joke's Over. I'm really hoping it gets more readable, but so far what should be a rollicking and rolling adventure tale -- Hunter S Thompson and Ralph Steadman drink, drug and lie their way through the world -- is just a step or two above watching paint dry.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Mon Apr 30, 2007 3:13 pm

I'm not having such a great time of it, myself. Since I committed to read a selection of Vonnegut a week from tonight, I'm racing through hundreds of pages of him, and finding (a) almost none of the material I remember with fondness is as fun or memorable to me as it was the first time, and (b) most of the stuff I hadn't read before wasn't worth it.

Specifically, _Slaughterhouse-Five_ and _Mother Night_ hold up reasonably well, but mostly for a great story (especially the first), rather than how well they are told. _Palm Sunday_ and _Wampeters..._ are fitfully amusing and instructive, but less than I remember. _A Man Without a Country_ is fairly weak, _Deadeye Dick_ was a slog, and _God Bless You, Dr. Kevorkian_ was an irritating enigma.

The only bright light has been _Galapagos_, which I had not read before, and is proving to be all right, certainly compared with the other later works I've read. Your comment about _Cat's Cradle_, a copy of which I hope to get my hands on in the next 48 hours, gives me a sinking feeling, Steve.

Like Stephen King, I think Vonnegut is a guy I really like as a person, but whose writing I find only intermittently rewarding.

On the other hand, the book I reviewed for the Oregonian last week was a refreshing experience:

http://www.oregonlive.com/books/oregoni ... xml&coll=7
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby Moderator » Mon Apr 30, 2007 3:38 pm

David -
Try the short story Welcome to the Monkey House (if the audience is "of age"), or excerpts from TIMEQUAKE and BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS. I might also suggest Malachi Constant's departure speech from THE SIRENS OF TITAN.

But, yeah, what you wrote about rereading some of these things...

SB
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.


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