Pavilion Digest: August 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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Kris Nelson
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:37 pm

DWST Poster

Postby Kris Nelson » Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:35 am

Name: Kris Nelson
Source: unca20091007.htm
If there are any posters still available, I would certainly love to purchase one.

Sincere thanks.



Kris Nelson
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:37 pm

DWST Poster

Postby Kris Nelson » Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:35 am

Name: Kris Nelson
Source: unca20091009.htm
If there are any posters still available, I would certainly love to purchase one.

Sincere thanks.



User avatar
FinderDoug
Posts: 1530
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 1:58 pm
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Postby FinderDoug » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:36 am

Name: FinderDoug
Source: unca20091007.htm
Harlan and John Carmichael:

In case this wasnt already pointed out to you, my two cents worth of Guardianship:

http://trekmovie.com/2009/08/19/new-sta ... -gamescom/

The Guardian used as an element of promo piece for new Star Trek online game. That was as of August 19 - note the Harlans Guardian photo caption (scroll down).

Aaaaand at least one report from Star Trek: The Exhibition from May, 2009 noting the life-sized Guardian that was on display at the Detroit Science Center. Its still depicted in the slideshow for the exhibition on the web site, though a disclaimer notes that not everything will appear at every venue, so it may no longer be in the traveling Trek circus:

http://www.startrekexhibition.com/slideshow/

The Exhibition is currently at the Franklin Institute in Philly, so someone might be able to tell you if the life-sized Guardian is still on display.


Dennis J. :

No. Not too late. Never too late.

I started scribbling words for my own amusement when I was my age was still in the single digits. I cartooned (badly) I wrote plays (poorly) and I conceived of some of the most derivative Twilight Zone-esque twist ending crap fiction you could imagine, if your imagination was hobbled at Khe Sanh and spent several years learning to walk again.

I was a sports reporter summers during college and collected a fat folder of clips. There was a lot of creative writing, but very little of it got any play a Star Trek-centric fanfic co-authored with my roommate and a solo short story in the mimeographed paper for our campus community at SUNY Binghamton. Nothing professional. Wasnt even close to ready yet.

On occasion, I gave it up or set it aside. Or it changed shape poetry or scripts instead of fiction. I was off fiction for some time, with the exception of one spurt in 1997 that produced a handful of stories and 70,000 words of a novel (still unfinished). One of those stories Linus On The Savannah, a epistalatory Peanuts pastiche Im still quite proud of (its been read aloud in public, with my blessing, by its biggest booster, who shall remain nameless) . By and large, I wrote when the mood hit and otherwise I had other things going on . But I am a sea of ideas that interest me, so I kept coming around to short fiction again. Submissions and rejections followed in a similar cycle.

I was 38 when Eric Heideman at Tales of the Unanticipated in Minneapolis bought Mister Eddie, my first professionally sold and published short story - a Poe-centric ghost story told in the first person by a Baltimore gang kid. It had been cooking in my head for a couple of years before pen went to paper, born of the collision of two elements: the annual visit by a mysterious stranger to Poes grave, and a little piece I read which claimed that the gang kids in Baltimore no only believed Poes ghost haunted his old home, but respected him enough to call him Mister Eddie. When it was ready, it poured out of me. There are few emotional highs greater than the combination of the words have and accepted the first time around. Is it any good? I think so, but I love my children warts and all.

My pace since then? Im 41 now. In spite of working part time on my masters while working full time to pay pesky things like rent, the creative works has been more regular, and with success two more stories are slated for TOTU, I have an anthology sale (and the anthology might even see print in my lifetime) under my belt, Ive had a couple of online flash fiction appearances, and Ive got a clutch of stories circulating with more being worked on in my head, even as I type this. By December, I should have a dozen in the hands of editors, in slush piles, or doing the tango with Christmas cards in the mail stream. Might even have the first draft of a new novel under my belt.

Have you waited too long? Not at 37. Not even at 57. So long as you have an interesting story, and its well-told, I say its never too late.

BUT (there had to be one) if you believe your work is absolute crap, then work on it. Raise your game. Read and understand the mechanics of strong writers, writers whose work speaks to you, and see how and why their work clicks and hums. Build your own mechanics and discover your voice. Get yourself a couple of readers you trust to be honest with you not the rah-rah Gee, that was swell! type thats going to rubber stamp a story because they like you and will overlook blemishes or grammatical horrors because they dont want to discourage you. You need someone who is going to say It doesnt work for me, and heres why. And you need to be able to hear them and to know when the argument is valid versus when its a personal preference.

Now, go write!

User avatar
FinderDoug
Posts: 1530
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 1:58 pm
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Postby FinderDoug » Wed Aug 26, 2009 3:36 am

Name: FinderDoug
Source: unca20091009.htm
Harlan and John Carmichael:

In case this wasnt already pointed out to you, my two cents worth of Guardianship:

http://trekmovie.com/2009/08/19/new-sta ... -gamescom/

The Guardian used as an element of promo piece for new Star Trek online game. That was as of August 19 - note the Harlans Guardian photo caption (scroll down).

Aaaaand at least one report from Star Trek: The Exhibition from May, 2009 noting the life-sized Guardian that was on display at the Detroit Science Center. Its still depicted in the slideshow for the exhibition on the web site, though a disclaimer notes that not everything will appear at every venue, so it may no longer be in the traveling Trek circus:

http://www.startrekexhibition.com/slideshow/

The Exhibition is currently at the Franklin Institute in Philly, so someone might be able to tell you if the life-sized Guardian is still on display.


Dennis J. :

No. Not too late. Never too late.

I started scribbling words for my own amusement when I was my age was still in the single digits. I cartooned (badly) I wrote plays (poorly) and I conceived of some of the most derivative Twilight Zone-esque twist ending crap fiction you could imagine, if your imagination was hobbled at Khe Sanh and spent several years learning to walk again.

I was a sports reporter summers during college and collected a fat folder of clips. There was a lot of creative writing, but very little of it got any play a Star Trek-centric fanfic co-authored with my roommate and a solo short story in the mimeographed paper for our campus community at SUNY Binghamton. Nothing professional. Wasnt even close to ready yet.

On occasion, I gave it up or set it aside. Or it changed shape poetry or scripts instead of fiction. I was off fiction for some time, with the exception of one spurt in 1997 that produced a handful of stories and 70,000 words of a novel (still unfinished). One of those stories Linus On The Savannah, a epistalatory Peanuts pastiche Im still quite proud of (its been read aloud in public, with my blessing, by its biggest booster, who shall remain nameless) . By and large, I wrote when the mood hit and otherwise I had other things going on . But I am a sea of ideas that interest me, so I kept coming around to short fiction again. Submissions and rejections followed in a similar cycle.

I was 38 when Eric Heideman at Tales of the Unanticipated in Minneapolis bought Mister Eddie, my first professionally sold and published short story - a Poe-centric ghost story told in the first person by a Baltimore gang kid. It had been cooking in my head for a couple of years before pen went to paper, born of the collision of two elements: the annual visit by a mysterious stranger to Poes grave, and a little piece I read which claimed that the gang kids in Baltimore no only believed Poes ghost haunted his old home, but respected him enough to call him Mister Eddie. When it was ready, it poured out of me. There are few emotional highs greater than the combination of the words have and accepted the first time around. Is it any good? I think so, but I love my children warts and all.

My pace since then? Im 41 now. In spite of working part time on my masters while working full time to pay pesky things like rent, the creative works has been more regular, and with success two more stories are slated for TOTU, I have an anthology sale (and the anthology might even see print in my lifetime) under my belt, Ive had a couple of online flash fiction appearances, and Ive got a clutch of stories circulating with more being worked on in my head, even as I type this. By December, I should have a dozen in the hands of editors, in slush piles, or doing the tango with Christmas cards in the mail stream. Might even have the first draft of a new novel under my belt.

Have you waited too long? Not at 37. Not even at 57. So long as you have an interesting story, and its well-told, I say its never too late.

BUT (there had to be one) if you believe your work is absolute crap, then work on it. Raise your game. Read and understand the mechanics of strong writers, writers whose work speaks to you, and see how and why their work clicks and hums. Build your own mechanics and discover your voice. Get yourself a couple of readers you trust to be honest with you not the rah-rah Gee, that was swell! type thats going to rubber stamp a story because they like you and will overlook blemishes or grammatical horrors because they dont want to discourage you. You need someone who is going to say It doesnt work for me, and heres why. And you need to be able to hear them and to know when the argument is valid versus when its a personal preference.

Now, go write!

CSK

Blish Trek Treatments

Postby CSK » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:10 am

Name: CSK
Source: unca20091007.htm
re: Tom Morgan "Near as I can tell there were not 12 STs but 11 (sorry, Bob). Each STR contain 3 STs, though not in order. STR IV is thus left one book short, which is made up for by including the Blish novel Spock Must Die."

No, there were 12 plus an extra. Blish died before finishing #12, so there was a gap of a few years before it came out in 1977, coauthored by his widow (J. A. Lawrence). And then the two missing Harry Mudd episodes came out in a separate volume "Mudd's Angels," which also included an original Mudd story.

CSK

Blish Trek Treatments

Postby CSK » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:10 am

Name: CSK
Source: unca20091009.htm
re: Tom Morgan "Near as I can tell there were not 12 STs but 11 (sorry, Bob). Each STR contain 3 STs, though not in order. STR IV is thus left one book short, which is made up for by including the Blish novel Spock Must Die."

No, there were 12 plus an extra. Blish died before finishing #12, so there was a gap of a few years before it came out in 1977, coauthored by his widow (J. A. Lawrence). And then the two missing Harry Mudd episodes came out in a separate volume "Mudd's Angels," which also included an original Mudd story.

Susan Ellison
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:20 pm

Postby Susan Ellison » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:30 am

Name: SUSAN ELLISON
Source: unca20091007.htm
RE: Posters:

I've got one on hold for: Shagin, Steve, Paul, Jim Louis, Steve Barber, Charlie, Kris and Jeff.

Thank you--Susan

Susan Ellison
Posts: 68
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:20 pm

Postby Susan Ellison » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:30 am

Name: SUSAN ELLISON
Source: unca20091009.htm
RE: Posters:

I've got one on hold for: Shagin, Steve, Paul, Jim Louis, Steve Barber, Charlie, Kris and Jeff.

Thank you--Susan

Dennis C
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:23 pm

Harlan mention

Postby Dennis C » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:51 am

Name: Dennis C
Source: unca20091007.htm
At a Writer's Workshop at WorldCon, I was told to download William Shunn's "Proper Manuscript Format" for short stories. Just got around to it. And it is very useful. On page 6 of the guidelines is the following:
"Unless you are Harlan Ellison, your editor is actually going to read your manuscript before sending it on to the typesetter..."
Harlan is the only writer mentioned in the piece. I suppose that means, according to Shunn, he's the only writer whose words and punctuation you better not f*** with...

Here's the link:
http://www.shunn.net/format/story.html

*************************************************

Rest well, Ted Kennedy. We'll miss you. And we'll really miss those 60 votes in the Senate for the health care reform bill you wanted to much...

Dennis C
Posts: 105
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:23 pm

Harlan mention

Postby Dennis C » Wed Aug 26, 2009 7:51 am

Name: Dennis C
Source: unca20091009.htm
At a Writer's Workshop at WorldCon, I was told to download William Shunn's "Proper Manuscript Format" for short stories. Just got around to it. And it is very useful. On page 6 of the guidelines is the following:
"Unless you are Harlan Ellison, your editor is actually going to read your manuscript before sending it on to the typesetter..."
Harlan is the only writer mentioned in the piece. I suppose that means, according to Shunn, he's the only writer whose words and punctuation you better not f*** with...

Here's the link:
http://www.shunn.net/format/story.html

*************************************************

Rest well, Ted Kennedy. We'll miss you. And we'll really miss those 60 votes in the Senate for the health care reform bill you wanted to much...

Charlie
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:46 pm
Location: St. Pete., FL

Poster

Postby Charlie » Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:14 am

Name: Charlie
Source: unca20091007.htm
Susan, Acknowledged. Check out by tomorrow to HERC. Thanks.

Charlie
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:46 pm
Location: St. Pete., FL

Poster

Postby Charlie » Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:14 am

Name: Charlie
Source: unca20091009.htm
Susan, Acknowledged. Check out by tomorrow to HERC. Thanks.

Charlie
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:46 pm
Location: St. Pete., FL

Postby Charlie » Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:16 am

Name: Charlie
Source: unca20091007.htm
ooppss, sorry, that's TKC, not HERC.

Charlie
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 9:46 pm
Location: St. Pete., FL

Postby Charlie » Wed Aug 26, 2009 8:16 am

Name: Charlie
Source: unca20091009.htm
ooppss, sorry, that's TKC, not HERC.

Tony Adams

DWST poster

Postby Tony Adams » Wed Aug 26, 2009 10:26 am

Name: Tony Adams
Source: unca20091007.htm
I'd love one as well!!!

Thank you.
Tony


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