Pavilion Digest: August 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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Samuel John Klein
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Location: Portland, Oregon
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When TV Strove To Tell Good Stories; The Plural Of David Lof

Postby Samuel John Klein » Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:10 am

Name: Samuel John Klein
Source: unca20091009.htm
(Righter's Note: a couple of habitues here suggested I post this here. So here we are. Enjoy!)

So, I was watching an episode from the classic The Twilight Zone yesterday.

Thank Whatever You Call God Or The Creator for the Intertubes. I was able to read up and watch an entire half-hour of classic television for free (well, they've figured out how to stick commercials in it, but I've been conditioned to accept that by thirty years of TV watching, it's not the worst i've had to endure).

Anyway, for some reason, I found myself watching "The Midnight Sun", which is the kind of end-of-the-world doom tale that I dote on (and which, for many years, frightened me of the Sun. I work 3rd shift now. Coincidence?). Maybe I was just punishing myself to be watching this strange tale in the middle of the most sweltering heat wave the Pacific Northwest in general and Oregon in particular in the last thirty years, I don't know.

I, for some reason, feel drawn to stories where the 'end of the world', however you define it, is imminent and palpable (such as "The Midnight Sun") or just in the rear-view mirror (The Omega Man, Lord forgive me). And "The Midnight Sun" not only has the characters staring down the barrel of TEOTWAWKI, even in the twist ending, but it has more than that and less.

The following will seem trite, as It's been observed by everyone who bemoans the state of television up to me, but they were able to do so much make you feel as though you are trapped on an Earth that is spiralling into the Sun, make you believe that the Sun never sets, give you the feeling of extreme heat and torpor, with FX that would be laughably simple to the jaded TV FX geek of today. One choice shot of a deserted street, one FX composite of a big, bright light over an urban skyline, views of a skyline background through the windows, everything high-valued (which is important when the whole thing was done in brilliant black-and-white), and the characters expressed what couldn't be seen by their motions.

Everything acted in that production, even the inanimate objects! It didn't hurt that the actors did a fine job of communicating the act of being actively stifled. And the real amazement on this was that what the early-60s-era special effects actually engaged you despite the fact it was TV, you weren't passive. Your mind was filling in the bright colors, the blinding light it was drawing you into the doomed Earth of the teleplay.

It was then I realized one thing that I didn't know about me. I figured out I was born about thirty or forty years too late. I have, from time to time, fancied myself a real writer, for various reasons; If you hit it big, you became rather rich, and then later, as I grew maturer within myself, I realized that I write because of the feeling I"m getting right now; forming words and incarnating thoughts into coherent sentence really fucking feels good. It's when I really feel alive!

How much cooler would it have been to have been on the frontier of forging what great television could have been? Slugging away making a living (probably underpaid) striving to tell great stories and good drama on television? I should have been a young adult then. The real interesting thing is, you didn't know back then you were defining the acme of what TV storytelling could be then. There are some great examples now, but most of the buzz is around things that recycle other things. The people who wrote for TZ were unafraid. I'll bet most of them thought that TV could only go upward from there.

But it would have been a kick in the absolute ass to be on the front lines of media back then. Name were made, and monuments were constructed, and when they think of the greatness that story telling on TV could be, what do they think? Shows like Twilight Zone, constructed by serious dramatists who were inspired by iconoclast playwrights, who had amazing things to day and fooled everyone into watching it and thinking about what they were saying and without knowing it, starting to evolve.

Would they have worked any differently, knowing that it was mostly going to be downhill from there?

If the screenwriters of today tried to tell "The Midnight Sun" with today's FX technology, you would have gotten a visual treat but one that would have been ultimately dull. And you would have let it wash over you, not fallen into it.

There's a reason McLuhan called in "The Vast Wasteland". He saw the rot coming, years before everyone else did. They thought he was just being fresh.

We've come so far.

In other news:
PAUL ATX: Yes. The plural of David Loftus would be David Lofti. Much less awkward than "Loftuses". We need more David Lofti!

ROB: It would not be the first time conservatives repudiated something that was once the heart of their brand and won them hearts and minds when those hearts and minds no longer could be won. It's astoundingly predictable actually. If Colridge's Ancient Mariner were conservative, he would believe that he would rid himself of the Albatross by simply denying it.

Shane Shellenbarger
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:11 am

Ray Bradbury's 89th Birthday!

Postby Shane Shellenbarger » Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:26 am

Name: Shane Shellenbarger
Source: unca20091007.htm
On August 22, 2009, William F. Nolan will be hosting a birthday party for Ray Bradbury at Mystery and Imagination Bookshop,
238 N. Brand Blvd.,Glendale, CA. The event will be from 2-4 p.m.

Shane Shellenbarger
Posts: 45
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2006 9:11 am

Ray Bradbury's 89th Birthday!

Postby Shane Shellenbarger » Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:26 am

Name: Shane Shellenbarger
Source: unca20091009.htm
On August 22, 2009, William F. Nolan will be hosting a birthday party for Ray Bradbury at Mystery and Imagination Bookshop,
238 N. Brand Blvd.,Glendale, CA. The event will be from 2-4 p.m.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:11 am

Name: David Loftus
Source: unca20091007.htm
Since a couple of you expressed interest, I just posted the following to my local friends and colleagues, under the subject header "Loftus rallies the troops" (I think this activity might be filed under "Harlan-esque" -- perhaps even "Harlequin-esque" endeavors:


Many of you have already seen the essay I placed on the Oregonian's op-ed Web page, "The Stump," on Thursday, about my latest bit of fun and troublemaking. If you haven't, here it is:

http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index ... _camp.html

The op-ed page editor seemed really interested in how this adventure is going to play out -- you'll notice the online copy says "stay tuned for the denouement" at the bottom -- so there's a good chance I'll get to write some more if anything further happens of interest.

If the property owner sticks to his or her stated deadline, there may be some excitement on Monday. I plan to get out to the site with a deck chair, cold drink, something to read, and a digital camera.

This is your invitation to drop by if you have a minute, or join me for however long you can hang out, inspect the doomed plants, and visit. Have your photo taken with them before they're executed . . . or just possibly help them win a reprieve. The location is SW Eleventh between Columbia and Clay. That's just behind the Portland Korean Church, catty-corner from Safeway to the southeast. I'd love to see you.

My cell phone number is (503) 703-0876.

-- David Loftus

P.S. Don't forget my Ray Bradbury reading at 7:30 p.m. Monday evening at Grendel's Coffee House, East 8th and Burnside.



Paul suggested the proper plural is "Lofti"; I couldn't say for certain, but I have heard that formulation employed in the past, by folks both inside and outside of the family.



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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:11 am

Name: David Loftus
Source: unca20091009.htm
Since a couple of you expressed interest, I just posted the following to my local friends and colleagues, under the subject header "Loftus rallies the troops" (I think this activity might be filed under "Harlan-esque" -- perhaps even "Harlequin-esque" endeavors:


Many of you have already seen the essay I placed on the Oregonian's op-ed Web page, "The Stump," on Thursday, about my latest bit of fun and troublemaking. If you haven't, here it is:

http://www.oregonlive.com/opinion/index ... _camp.html

The op-ed page editor seemed really interested in how this adventure is going to play out -- you'll notice the online copy says "stay tuned for the denouement" at the bottom -- so there's a good chance I'll get to write some more if anything further happens of interest.

If the property owner sticks to his or her stated deadline, there may be some excitement on Monday. I plan to get out to the site with a deck chair, cold drink, something to read, and a digital camera.

This is your invitation to drop by if you have a minute, or join me for however long you can hang out, inspect the doomed plants, and visit. Have your photo taken with them before they're executed . . . or just possibly help them win a reprieve. The location is SW Eleventh between Columbia and Clay. That's just behind the Portland Korean Church, catty-corner from Safeway to the southeast. I'd love to see you.

My cell phone number is (503) 703-0876.

-- David Loftus

P.S. Don't forget my Ray Bradbury reading at 7:30 p.m. Monday evening at Grendel's Coffee House, East 8th and Burnside.



Paul suggested the proper plural is "Lofti"; I couldn't say for certain, but I have heard that formulation employed in the past, by folks both inside and outside of the family.



Richard Cohen

Postby Richard Cohen » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:41 am

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091007.htm
LE,
thanks for report on the Dillon notecards.
If you get more info on same, I hope you'll post it here.
From your description LD015 sounds like the sleeve
the Dillons did for the Caedmon 'The Wizard of Oz' LP
(read by Ray Bolger).
They did lots of nice Caedmon sleeves; especially striking: "Kipling's Red Dog")

Richard

Richard Cohen

Postby Richard Cohen » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:41 am

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091009.htm
LE,
thanks for report on the Dillon notecards.
If you get more info on same, I hope you'll post it here.
From your description LD015 sounds like the sleeve
the Dillons did for the Caedmon 'The Wizard of Oz' LP
(read by Ray Bolger).
They did lots of nice Caedmon sleeves; especially striking: "Kipling's Red Dog")

Richard

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FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Postby FrankChurch » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:42 am

Name: Frank Church
Source: unca20091007.htm
Rob, I'm not blaming you, maybe you didn't see it, but KOS was taken out of context:

"Laissez Faire economics is not at the heart of conservative politics."

But, Kim also said this:

"It's one thread of conservative thought, agreed."

KOS did admit that it was one thread of conservative thought, which is a correct statement. Libertarians tend to agree with Laissez Faire but most actual conservatives love government subsidy--ask the banks and the car companies. Top-down socialism is not Laissez Faire.

Libertarians can afford to debate this issue, since they live in a fantasy world.

Rob, don't get mad at me, which you usually do, just had to defend my friend KOS.

--------------

Messer, eventually government should be dismantled, replaced with community socialism, but that's later. Big government protects us from the vipers.





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FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Postby FrankChurch » Sun Aug 02, 2009 8:42 am

Name: Frank Church
Source: unca20091009.htm
Rob, I'm not blaming you, maybe you didn't see it, but KOS was taken out of context:

"Laissez Faire economics is not at the heart of conservative politics."

But, Kim also said this:

"It's one thread of conservative thought, agreed."

KOS did admit that it was one thread of conservative thought, which is a correct statement. Libertarians tend to agree with Laissez Faire but most actual conservatives love government subsidy--ask the banks and the car companies. Top-down socialism is not Laissez Faire.

Libertarians can afford to debate this issue, since they live in a fantasy world.

Rob, don't get mad at me, which you usually do, just had to defend my friend KOS.

--------------

Messer, eventually government should be dismantled, replaced with community socialism, but that's later. Big government protects us from the vipers.





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Lori Koonce
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Location: San Francisco California
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Chuck Messer

Postby Lori Koonce » Sun Aug 02, 2009 9:36 am

Name: Lori Koonce
Source: unca20091007.htm
Not you specifically, but something you said earlier today.

There is a big difference between a failed state, which Somalia is, and less government.

I don't think federal or state governments have the right to tell two adults they cannot marry, but they have that right.

I also don't think that state or federal government has the right to tell an adult what kind of substances to put in their bodies, but they do.

There are laws that make things work smoothly for everyone, and then there are intrusive laws that are intended to oppress or deny minorities the rights and privileges of being an American.

I, along with many others, thing the first group are quite all right, and that the second group should be abolished if they exist and never enacted if at all possible.

And, just so ya know, most people who know me personally would consider me a bleeding heart liberal.

Lori

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Lori Koonce
Posts: 3538
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:10 pm
Location: San Francisco California
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Chuck Messer

Postby Lori Koonce » Sun Aug 02, 2009 9:36 am

Name: Lori Koonce
Source: unca20091009.htm
Not you specifically, but something you said earlier today.

There is a big difference between a failed state, which Somalia is, and less government.

I don't think federal or state governments have the right to tell two adults they cannot marry, but they have that right.

I also don't think that state or federal government has the right to tell an adult what kind of substances to put in their bodies, but they do.

There are laws that make things work smoothly for everyone, and then there are intrusive laws that are intended to oppress or deny minorities the rights and privileges of being an American.

I, along with many others, thing the first group are quite all right, and that the second group should be abolished if they exist and never enacted if at all possible.

And, just so ya know, most people who know me personally would consider me a bleeding heart liberal.

Lori

paul
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Free things are cool.

Postby paul » Sun Aug 02, 2009 11:22 am

Name: Paul
Source: unca20091007.htm
To put a fine point on it, free 35 pulp paperback doubles from 1960 by my favorite author sent by very kind internet friends are doubleplus cool.

Good as his word, shipped tight and safe, on the house. Thank you, Doug.

paul
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Free things are cool.

Postby paul » Sun Aug 02, 2009 11:22 am

Name: Paul
Source: unca20091009.htm
To put a fine point on it, free 35 pulp paperback doubles from 1960 by my favorite author sent by very kind internet friends are doubleplus cool.

Good as his word, shipped tight and safe, on the house. Thank you, Doug.

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Jan
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Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:25 pm
Location: Köln

Postby Jan » Sun Aug 02, 2009 4:20 pm

Name: Jan
Source: unca20091007.htm
Harlan, the Delos editor, Silvio, will be glad to send you all the *PDF versions* of those issues for free (via Steve). Am asking him to go ahead. Of #106 (Dangerous Visions review) you/I could, theoretically, purchase an on-demand print version for around $20+. The earlier issues were PDF/web only. (Now they print new issues themselves.) Silvio might show up here.

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Jan
Posts: 1817
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:25 pm
Location: Köln

Postby Jan » Sun Aug 02, 2009 4:20 pm

Name: Jan
Source: unca20091009.htm
Harlan, the Delos editor, Silvio, will be glad to send you all the *PDF versions* of those issues for free (via Steve). Am asking him to go ahead. Of #106 (Dangerous Visions review) you/I could, theoretically, purchase an on-demand print version for around $20+. The earlier issues were PDF/web only. (Now they print new issues themselves.) Silvio might show up here.


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