Pavilion Digest: August 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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Richard Cohen

CotEoF Product Info For Mr. Carmichael


Postby Richard Cohen » Tue Aug 25, 2009 3:53 pm

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091007.htm
Expect you know all this (or it's otherwise useless),
but just in case:

Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments: Inside Stories from the Artists Who Created Them
by John Peterson p63
has a piece on the sculptor of the Guardian ornament.
It quotes her on Paramount's having to approve *everything.*

See it at
http://books.google.com/books?id=JajE13 ... nt&f=false

Also,
don't know if this would qualify as the sort of merchandising in
question in your lawsuit, but it IS City-related:

Star Trek Giant Poster Book Voyage Two (October 1976)

featured a photo-illustrated article
cover advertised as: "Harlan Ellison's 'City,' A Critique"
The article, "The City on the Edge of Forever: A Star Trek Critique" by Mitch Green,
is chiefly devoted to describing Harlan's original teleplay (presumbably from a reading
of play & essay as published in SIX SCIENCE FICTION PLAYS -- which book is recommended
at the end of the article.
There are three photos (Guardian & 4 cast members; Kirk & Edith; Kirk & Spock in '30s garb);
and each is accompanied with what is meant to look like an actual script excerpt --
i.e. set in typewriter-style typeface (?Courier) -- though in impossibly narrow columns.
The Guardian picture's quote includes the "since before your sun..." lines as they're heard
in the produced CITY.
Note that the 'unfolded-sheet' poster in this number is NOT from CITY and,
according to
http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Star_Tr ... oster_Book
(q.v.) none of the posters in subsequent numbers were CITY-related either.


Richard Cohen

CotEoF Product Info For Mr. Carmichael


Postby Richard Cohen » Tue Aug 25, 2009 3:53 pm

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091009.htm
Expect you know all this (or it's otherwise useless),
but just in case:

Hallmark Keepsake Ornaments: Inside Stories from the Artists Who Created Them
by John Peterson p63
has a piece on the sculptor of the Guardian ornament.
It quotes her on Paramount's having to approve *everything.*

See it at
http://books.google.com/books?id=JajE13 ... nt&f=false

Also,
don't know if this would qualify as the sort of merchandising in
question in your lawsuit, but it IS City-related:

Star Trek Giant Poster Book Voyage Two (October 1976)

featured a photo-illustrated article
cover advertised as: "Harlan Ellison's 'City,' A Critique"
The article, "The City on the Edge of Forever: A Star Trek Critique" by Mitch Green,
is chiefly devoted to describing Harlan's original teleplay (presumbably from a reading
of play & essay as published in SIX SCIENCE FICTION PLAYS -- which book is recommended
at the end of the article.
There are three photos (Guardian & 4 cast members; Kirk & Edith; Kirk & Spock in '30s garb);
and each is accompanied with what is meant to look like an actual script excerpt --
i.e. set in typewriter-style typeface (?Courier) -- though in impossibly narrow columns.
The Guardian picture's quote includes the "since before your sun..." lines as they're heard
in the produced CITY.
Note that the 'unfolded-sheet' poster in this number is NOT from CITY and,
according to
http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Star_Tr ... oster_Book
(q.v.) none of the posters in subsequent numbers were CITY-related either.


Richard Cohen

CotEoF Product Info For Mr. Carmichael


Postby Richard Cohen » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:01 pm

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091007.htm
On that

Star Trek Giant Poster Book Voyage Two (October 1976)


-- the masthead says:
1976 Paramount Pictures Corporation
Published by Paradise Press Inc
Packaged by H. Bunch Associates

-- though 'Letters to the Editor' address lists
"Fiona Press" (919 3rd Ave, NY )

Richard Cohen

CotEoF Product Info For Mr. Carmichael


Postby Richard Cohen » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:01 pm

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091009.htm
On that

Star Trek Giant Poster Book Voyage Two (October 1976)


-- the masthead says:
1976 Paramount Pictures Corporation
Published by Paradise Press Inc
Packaged by H. Bunch Associates

-- though 'Letters to the Editor' address lists
"Fiona Press" (919 3rd Ave, NY )

Dennis J.

Too Late?

Postby Dennis J. » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:25 pm

Name: Dennis J.
Source: unca20091007.htm
Greetings One and All.

I've been observing this board for quite some time. I became a reader of Mr. Ellison's roughly five years ago, starting with Strange Wine and moving to The Essential Ellison 50 Year Retrospective, Slippage, The Glass Teat v1 & 2.

My time here has been enjoyable, and helps my day go just a smidge faster whilst whacking away at the keyboard, doing my bit in the digital pen for my daily bread.

I've rarely posted at Unca Harlan's, being at times painfully shy. However, I find many of the anecdotes and advice to aspiring writers to be both practical and frightening. This is the reason for my post now.

I've been, to be blunt, trying to convince myself to write for a few years now. I did some freelance newspaper work approximately three years ago. And by this I mean I submitted a writing sample, went for an interview, bought a copy of the AP Style Manual, and was "hired". They paid me a VERY small fee for photos, cuts, and the occasional one or two paragraphs from time to time. While not a "real" writing job, I considered it to be a foot in the door. This lasted about two months before the time away from my family forced me to reconsider.

I have a pretty good sense for people, and how to read them. I believe, without reservation, that my star was on the rise at this paper, small as it was, and that I could have done well if I had managed to stay on. C'est la vie, time marches on, I still had my "real" job as a computer network administrator.

Now I find myself hearing the music again. I've written a couple of short stories, which I believe are absolute crap (does anyone else trying to write believe this or is it just me??). However, I've begun to research a new idea, and feel good about this one.

My biggest concern is that I've waited too long. I'll be 37 in October, and I fear, constantly, that it's too late. Given our society's near obsession with the new, fresh, and young, this prey's much on my mind.

I am, humbly, asking for opinions. Especially from the folks who've had some success in this noble endeavor. I have no wish to impose, so if I am presuming too much, apologies in advance.

-Dennis J

Dennis J.

Too Late?

Postby Dennis J. » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:25 pm

Name: Dennis J.
Source: unca20091009.htm
Greetings One and All.

I've been observing this board for quite some time. I became a reader of Mr. Ellison's roughly five years ago, starting with Strange Wine and moving to The Essential Ellison 50 Year Retrospective, Slippage, The Glass Teat v1 & 2.

My time here has been enjoyable, and helps my day go just a smidge faster whilst whacking away at the keyboard, doing my bit in the digital pen for my daily bread.

I've rarely posted at Unca Harlan's, being at times painfully shy. However, I find many of the anecdotes and advice to aspiring writers to be both practical and frightening. This is the reason for my post now.

I've been, to be blunt, trying to convince myself to write for a few years now. I did some freelance newspaper work approximately three years ago. And by this I mean I submitted a writing sample, went for an interview, bought a copy of the AP Style Manual, and was "hired". They paid me a VERY small fee for photos, cuts, and the occasional one or two paragraphs from time to time. While not a "real" writing job, I considered it to be a foot in the door. This lasted about two months before the time away from my family forced me to reconsider.

I have a pretty good sense for people, and how to read them. I believe, without reservation, that my star was on the rise at this paper, small as it was, and that I could have done well if I had managed to stay on. C'est la vie, time marches on, I still had my "real" job as a computer network administrator.

Now I find myself hearing the music again. I've written a couple of short stories, which I believe are absolute crap (does anyone else trying to write believe this or is it just me??). However, I've begun to research a new idea, and feel good about this one.

My biggest concern is that I've waited too long. I'll be 37 in October, and I fear, constantly, that it's too late. Given our society's near obsession with the new, fresh, and young, this prey's much on my mind.

I am, humbly, asking for opinions. Especially from the folks who've had some success in this noble endeavor. I have no wish to impose, so if I am presuming too much, apologies in advance.

-Dennis J

Adam Zalonis

City on the Edge of Forever items...

Postby Adam Zalonis » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:49 pm

Name: Adam Zalonis
Source: unca20091007.htm
HARLAN: I wish you the very best in your court battle with the snakes that are Paramount. As far as items related to the episode in question, I do not know if these were mentioned or not, but I hope it helps nontheless.

Other than Franklin Mint, another company called the Hamilton Collection released a commemorative plate for "City on the Edge of Forever" back in the mid-80's. I was pilfering through EBAY where I found an auction for it complete with an image:http://cgi.ebay.com/STAR-TREK-PLATE-CITY-ON-THE-EDGE-OF-FOREVER-KIRK-SPOCK_W0QQitemZ6266171812QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item1757e31a4&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116

I also just found a magazine from the 1970's called "The Star Trek Files". Each issue apparently gave out specs and image captures as well as general background information about each episode. One such issue was "The City on the Edge of Forever". Once again, Ebay has really helped me in this matter.

http://cgi.ebay.com/STAR-TREK-PLATE-CIT ... .m20.l1116

Once again, I am trying to look through the myriad of different posts to see if these have already been mentioned and if I find that they have, sorry for posting them again. I hope it helps!



Adam Zalonis

City on the Edge of Forever items...

Postby Adam Zalonis » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:49 pm

Name: Adam Zalonis
Source: unca20091009.htm
HARLAN: I wish you the very best in your court battle with the snakes that are Paramount. As far as items related to the episode in question, I do not know if these were mentioned or not, but I hope it helps nontheless.

Other than Franklin Mint, another company called the Hamilton Collection released a commemorative plate for "City on the Edge of Forever" back in the mid-80's. I was pilfering through EBAY where I found an auction for it complete with an image:http://cgi.ebay.com/STAR-TREK-PLATE-CITY-ON-THE-EDGE-OF-FOREVER-KIRK-SPOCK_W0QQitemZ6266171812QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item1757e31a4&_trksid=p3286.m20.l1116

I also just found a magazine from the 1970's called "The Star Trek Files". Each issue apparently gave out specs and image captures as well as general background information about each episode. One such issue was "The City on the Edge of Forever". Once again, Ebay has really helped me in this matter.

http://cgi.ebay.com/STAR-TREK-PLATE-CIT ... .m20.l1116

Once again, I am trying to look through the myriad of different posts to see if these have already been mentioned and if I find that they have, sorry for posting them again. I hope it helps!



steveperry
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:31 am

Postby steveperry » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:54 pm

Name: Stephen
Source: unca20091007.htm
= All of this as response when Paramount sits down and tries to
= plead parsimony (the "we is jus' po' li'l licensors, workin'
= in the beanfield") with their quivering paws holding the tin cup

aw, you left out the eye patch! how can that image be complete
without them quivering behind an eye patch! the poor wee bairns...

steveperry
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:31 am

Postby steveperry » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:54 pm

Name: Stephen
Source: unca20091009.htm
= All of this as response when Paramount sits down and tries to
= plead parsimony (the "we is jus' po' li'l licensors, workin'
= in the beanfield") with their quivering paws holding the tin cup

aw, you left out the eye patch! how can that image be complete
without them quivering behind an eye patch! the poor wee bairns...

Adam-Troy
Posts: 301
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 10:05 am
Contact:

A Quick Reply

Postby Adam-Troy » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:56 pm

Name: Adam-Troy Castro
Source: unca20091007.htm
Dennis J,

"How vain it is to sit down to write when one has not stood up to live." ~ Henry David Thoreau.

I don't know if you're any good now, or if you'll ever be, but you have lived some life and you're in a position to tell us about it.

If I encounter one of your stories, I will not know whether it was written by a young person or an old one. I will only know whether the story moves me.

Beyond that I will only say that people have started later in life than you have...not just in literature, but in painting, and in music, and have made their mark. Whether you deserve to is another matter. But your age is an irrelevant criterion.

Adam-Troy
Posts: 301
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 10:05 am
Contact:

A Quick Reply

Postby Adam-Troy » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:56 pm

Name: Adam-Troy Castro
Source: unca20091009.htm
Dennis J,

"How vain it is to sit down to write when one has not stood up to live." ~ Henry David Thoreau.

I don't know if you're any good now, or if you'll ever be, but you have lived some life and you're in a position to tell us about it.

If I encounter one of your stories, I will not know whether it was written by a young person or an old one. I will only know whether the story moves me.

Beyond that I will only say that people have started later in life than you have...not just in literature, but in painting, and in music, and have made their mark. Whether you deserve to is another matter. But your age is an irrelevant criterion.

Adam-Troy
Posts: 301
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 10:05 am
Contact:

Addendum

Postby Adam-Troy » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:57 pm

Name: Adam-Troy Castro
Source: unca20091007.htm
One name occurs to me: James Tiptree Jr. (Alice B. Sheldon). Sold one story to the New Yorker in the 1940s. Her fiction pen fell silent until the early seventies. She hit the sf field like a comet, older than you are now. So it is not impossible. Far from that.

Adam-Troy
Posts: 301
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2005 10:05 am
Contact:

Addendum

Postby Adam-Troy » Tue Aug 25, 2009 4:57 pm

Name: Adam-Troy Castro
Source: unca20091009.htm
One name occurs to me: James Tiptree Jr. (Alice B. Sheldon). Sold one story to the New Yorker in the 1940s. Her fiction pen fell silent until the early seventies. She hit the sf field like a comet, older than you are now. So it is not impossible. Far from that.

steveperry
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:31 am

Never Too Late

Postby steveperry » Tue Aug 25, 2009 5:14 pm

Name: Steve Perry
Source: unca20091007.htm
Lot of folks start trying to write early, but not all do. I'm no example of expertise, but I spent a few years in the some-day-when-I-have-time-I'm-gonna-write mode. Until I realized that time wasn't piling up in the someday-bank.

I just looked up and realized I needed to get on the stick, because that was what I wanted to do when I grew up. Maybe I could have started earlier. Or maybe I wasn't ready because I needed to have done something first.

I was a bit younger than you, pushing thirty, but I've managed to write and sell a fair amount of material since.

Not talking literary excellence here -- but professional-class work isn't that difficult to achieve with a bit of practice. It's a skill -- it can be learned. Talent is something else, but sometimes skill will get you though times of no talent better than talent will get you through times of no skill (and thank you, Frank Freak.)

And I know of one woman who was in her fifties when she sat down to write a short story. Had a full time job, five kids, most of them still at home, and had to use the kitchen table, but the story turned into a book, and that into five more books, and she's doing quite well. She doesn't make any claims to literary excellence, but it does keep the wolf from the door. She probably makes more money than all of us here combined.

Money isn't the only measure, nor even the best one, but you are interesting in telling stories and getting paid for 'em, might as well start now. In five years, you'll be five years older, and you can have a bunch of stories or books under your belt or not. Go for it.

Perry


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