Pavilion Digest: July 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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Ezra Lb.
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:02 am
Location: Washington, DC

Postby Ezra Lb. » Mon Jul 27, 2009 5:16 am

Name: Ezra
Source: unca20091009.htm
Well I hadn't intended to do it but I went with some friends over the weekend to see the new Harry Potter movie. Just to be sociable, you understand. My problem is that I haven't actually read any of the actual books so once again I sat through a movie that was visually beautiful but otherwise practically incomprehensible.

I'm of the opinion that a movie adaptation should stand alone and not presuppose that the audience has already read the book. An adaptation of a literary work into a visual work is like translating one language into another. If you've ever done any of this you quickly realize that a literal word for word, one for one translation is the worst kind. If you doubt me go to Bable Fish or one of the other online translation utilities.

It is to the credit of the screenwriters for Peter Jackson's adaptations of the Lord of the Rings that they were able to do this, more or less. The accentuated the "sword & sorcery" aspects of the novel and even...GASP...changed the story to inforce visual continuity. This is not a debate on the relative merits of the movies versus the books but you could enjoy the former without the latter.

So here's my bullshit psycho-babble theory of the Harry Potter movies. They exist as worshipful illustrations of the books so that those folks whose imaginative capacity has been so atrophied by television that they can't do the imaginative heavy lifting required to create their own intepretation of the characters now have a visual template to sustain their reading of the books.

That this defeats the entire purpose of reading is beside the point. The coffers are filled with those golden coins before whose magic the gods themselves pale and cringe.




Mary
Posts: 44
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Postby Mary » Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:38 am

Name: Mary
Source: unca20091007.htm
I know, I'm breaking the continuity of this train of thought...many apologies.

But it's been over a week now since I've heard from the photography people, and even with all the good things that came from that interview (I was the first one they called in for an interview, by the way), I must resign myself to inevitability.

I go from depression to apathy to just plain being pissed off...and then I remind myself that I'm only human and this too shall pass.

I want this to pass sooner than later. I really can't take it anymore. So yours truly shall venture forth into the great wild and look for work yet again. I shall smile until my face hurts, I shall schmooze, hob nob, and make nice, and hopefully something will swing my way. I would rather work than sit at home staring at the four walls.

Although I did take in some reading. Read "The Poacher" by Ursula K. LeGuin. Damn she knows how to write...I respect! I've also delved into my short story collection and found some other hidden treasures. I love short story collections...I want a whole library of those.

Wish me luck people. I will try to keep my chin along with my head up, if only for the reason that I have to watch the road when I'm driving.



Mary
Posts: 44
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Postby Mary » Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:38 am

Name: Mary
Source: unca20091009.htm
I know, I'm breaking the continuity of this train of thought...many apologies.

But it's been over a week now since I've heard from the photography people, and even with all the good things that came from that interview (I was the first one they called in for an interview, by the way), I must resign myself to inevitability.

I go from depression to apathy to just plain being pissed off...and then I remind myself that I'm only human and this too shall pass.

I want this to pass sooner than later. I really can't take it anymore. So yours truly shall venture forth into the great wild and look for work yet again. I shall smile until my face hurts, I shall schmooze, hob nob, and make nice, and hopefully something will swing my way. I would rather work than sit at home staring at the four walls.

Although I did take in some reading. Read "The Poacher" by Ursula K. LeGuin. Damn she knows how to write...I respect! I've also delved into my short story collection and found some other hidden treasures. I love short story collections...I want a whole library of those.

Wish me luck people. I will try to keep my chin along with my head up, if only for the reason that I have to watch the road when I'm driving.



Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:45 am

Name: Alan Coil
Source: unca20091007.htm
Mary

In the words of Harlan Ellison in an introduction in Shatterday:

"You are not alone."

You are not the only one looking for work. Several people who post often here are also "between engagements". A couple have just recently found a job after many months of searching. One just lost his job over a week ago after 5 years of employment. It's a tough job market.

Best of luck to you in your job search. And best of luck to all the others who are searching.

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:45 am

Name: Alan Coil
Source: unca20091009.htm
Mary

In the words of Harlan Ellison in an introduction in Shatterday:

"You are not alone."

You are not the only one looking for work. Several people who post often here are also "between engagements". A couple have just recently found a job after many months of searching. One just lost his job over a week ago after 5 years of employment. It's a tough job market.

Best of luck to you in your job search. And best of luck to all the others who are searching.

john zeock
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:30 pm

Brit Stuff

Postby john zeock » Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:50 am

Name: john zeock
Source: unca20091007.htm
The strange thing is that if you outline the movie I'd find it hilarious. I've concluded that the actors were somehow just striking the wrong notes...for me. Imagine Streisand re recording Abbey Road. Being Human was much better than I suspected and I'll be watching. And the BBC has confirmed that,so far, John Simms, Bernard Cribbins and Catherine Tate are signed for the finale of Dr Who (nice to hear the name Quatermass on the air again...).

john zeock
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:30 pm

Brit Stuff

Postby john zeock » Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:50 am

Name: john zeock
Source: unca20091009.htm
The strange thing is that if you outline the movie I'd find it hilarious. I've concluded that the actors were somehow just striking the wrong notes...for me. Imagine Streisand re recording Abbey Road. Being Human was much better than I suspected and I'll be watching. And the BBC has confirmed that,so far, John Simms, Bernard Cribbins and Catherine Tate are signed for the finale of Dr Who (nice to hear the name Quatermass on the air again...).

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markabaddon
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Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 3:24 pm

Postby markabaddon » Mon Jul 27, 2009 7:07 am

Name: Mark Goldberg
Source: unca20091007.htm
Mary,

As someone who has been involved in the recruiting/hiring process let me say that a week is a fairly short period of time for someone to make a hiring decision, espeically if you were the first person that was called. People go on vacation during the summer, things are placed in the wrong pile, there are a ton of reasons why the people have not called you that have nothing to do with a rejection. If I may be so bold, have you considered a follow up call with the prospective employer? You might call and say something along the lines of "I had not heard from you and just wanted to reiterate how interested I am in this opportunity. Have any decisions been made about the hiring process yet?"

As somoene who has been laid off 4 times in my career already (and I ain't that old), I know how difficult it is to be out of work. You said you will smile until your face hurts and that is an excellent start, but you have to believe it and not simply wear a mask. Trust me, as someone who has done his fair share of interviews, depression and/or desperation always leaks through in one form or another.

I wish you the best of luck and if you need any assistance or advice, feel free to contact me at the email address listed above

All the best,

Mark

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markabaddon
Posts: 1790
Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 3:24 pm

Postby markabaddon » Mon Jul 27, 2009 7:07 am

Name: Mark Goldberg
Source: unca20091009.htm
Mary,

As someone who has been involved in the recruiting/hiring process let me say that a week is a fairly short period of time for someone to make a hiring decision, espeically if you were the first person that was called. People go on vacation during the summer, things are placed in the wrong pile, there are a ton of reasons why the people have not called you that have nothing to do with a rejection. If I may be so bold, have you considered a follow up call with the prospective employer? You might call and say something along the lines of "I had not heard from you and just wanted to reiterate how interested I am in this opportunity. Have any decisions been made about the hiring process yet?"

As somoene who has been laid off 4 times in my career already (and I ain't that old), I know how difficult it is to be out of work. You said you will smile until your face hurts and that is an excellent start, but you have to believe it and not simply wear a mask. Trust me, as someone who has done his fair share of interviews, depression and/or desperation always leaks through in one form or another.

I wish you the best of luck and if you need any assistance or advice, feel free to contact me at the email address listed above

All the best,

Mark

Justin
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2003 1:36 pm
Location: varies wildly

Postby Justin » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:02 am

Name: Justin
Source: unca20091007.htm
Assuming we're all fans of great documentaries about great writers, I recommend everybody check out The Mindscape of Alan Moore, a truly stellar documentary. If you loved Dreams With Sharp Teeth, you'll love Mindscape.

To those looking for a great summer read that's just pure fun, check out Dork Whore by Iris Bahr. Genius.

Justin
Posts: 19
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2003 1:36 pm
Location: varies wildly

Postby Justin » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:02 am

Name: Justin
Source: unca20091009.htm
Assuming we're all fans of great documentaries about great writers, I recommend everybody check out The Mindscape of Alan Moore, a truly stellar documentary. If you loved Dreams With Sharp Teeth, you'll love Mindscape.

To those looking for a great summer read that's just pure fun, check out Dork Whore by Iris Bahr. Genius.

Semi-Writer
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Unemployment

Postby Semi-Writer » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:30 am

Name: Semi-Writer
Source: unca20091007.htm
Mary, I've been on the unemployment trail for just over two years now. I'm not going to say it's been pleasant, but you do adapt and find ways to survive. (Let's just say that I've liquidized the majority of my possessions for the sake of gas money. Eh, who needs such outdated things as icky sofas, anyway?)

Other than the good/bad luck of inheriting some money this year after my grandmother's death--my father's parents died when he was young, so she was the only grandmother I ever knew--my only job prospects during the past few years have come from one-to-four-day a month secretarial work at my old job; extra/background work for minimum wage in TV shows and movies (I've only done this three days this YEAR, by the way); and selling people's cast-off items (curb surfing). So... er, anyone lookin' for a 1920s diamond window-door? ;-)

Craigslist, temp agencies, newspaper ads, online job sites... these make up the job market realities of today's economy. Gone are the 20-year employment positions with benefits and retirement packages and so on. One of my few saving graces is that I got a medical discharge from the military--thus, free health care for life. (But again, it's a good/bad thing because my condition(s) are what keep me from finding a regular job in the first damned place.)

Semi-Writer
Posts: 92
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:24 pm

Unemployment

Postby Semi-Writer » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:30 am

Name: Semi-Writer
Source: unca20091009.htm
Mary, I've been on the unemployment trail for just over two years now. I'm not going to say it's been pleasant, but you do adapt and find ways to survive. (Let's just say that I've liquidized the majority of my possessions for the sake of gas money. Eh, who needs such outdated things as icky sofas, anyway?)

Other than the good/bad luck of inheriting some money this year after my grandmother's death--my father's parents died when he was young, so she was the only grandmother I ever knew--my only job prospects during the past few years have come from one-to-four-day a month secretarial work at my old job; extra/background work for minimum wage in TV shows and movies (I've only done this three days this YEAR, by the way); and selling people's cast-off items (curb surfing). So... er, anyone lookin' for a 1920s diamond window-door? ;-)

Craigslist, temp agencies, newspaper ads, online job sites... these make up the job market realities of today's economy. Gone are the 20-year employment positions with benefits and retirement packages and so on. One of my few saving graces is that I got a medical discharge from the military--thus, free health care for life. (But again, it's a good/bad thing because my condition(s) are what keep me from finding a regular job in the first damned place.)

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FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:36 am

Name: Frank Church
Source: unca20091007.htm
Mary cannot find a job because corporations are shipping them overseas. Inventions are making the workplace more robot friendly, making hiring demands go down by leaps and bounds. Technology can be a good thing, but when it kills the worker, it kills us all.

----------

Mary, there is lots of work in the catering, restaurant field. You may not want to hear that, knowing that those jobs are demanding, hard and make your legs and arms hurt. Pay is not as good and you get shitty bosses. Beyond that...hehe.

Good luck sweet lady.

Frank, always the gentleman.

---------------

Cindy, Harlan is one lucky bastard and he knows it. Susan is his rock and he can be jagged, but all of us have those moments.

Not everybody can be as kindhearted as you. Why you are a conservative is still a blazing mystery. Hug.

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FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:36 am

Name: Frank Church
Source: unca20091009.htm
Mary cannot find a job because corporations are shipping them overseas. Inventions are making the workplace more robot friendly, making hiring demands go down by leaps and bounds. Technology can be a good thing, but when it kills the worker, it kills us all.

----------

Mary, there is lots of work in the catering, restaurant field. You may not want to hear that, knowing that those jobs are demanding, hard and make your legs and arms hurt. Pay is not as good and you get shitty bosses. Beyond that...hehe.

Good luck sweet lady.

Frank, always the gentleman.

---------------

Cindy, Harlan is one lucky bastard and he knows it. Susan is his rock and he can be jagged, but all of us have those moments.

Not everybody can be as kindhearted as you. Why you are a conservative is still a blazing mystery. Hug.


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