Pavilion Digest: July 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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Chuck Messer
Posts: 2089
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 9:15 pm
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

Postby Chuck Messer » Wed Jul 15, 2009 4:09 pm

Name: Chuck Messer
Source: unca20091009.htm
"Then up the road is Pahrump, which is where you can pay for some, well...you get the allusion? Just saying, not recommending. Just saying..."

That's also where the Martians got their comeuppance by way of Slim Whitman in MARS ATTACKS!

I didn't know the town really existed until I got a customer call while working customer service for a satellite TV company, who came from Pahrump. She was delighted to find out her town featured in a motion picture, even an SF comedy.

Mary: my fingers are braided for you. Good luck!

Chuck

Pogue
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:21 pm

Dynamic Duo

Postby Pogue » Wed Jul 15, 2009 6:34 pm

Name: Pogue
Source: unca20091007.htm
Ronald Colman & Fredric Brown...an odd couple, but two of my favourites. Ah...Random Harvest, If I were King, The Light That Failed...among many others. Ah...The Far Cry, The Night of the Jabberwock, Screaming Mimi...among many others.

Pogue
Posts: 19
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:21 pm

Dynamic Duo

Postby Pogue » Wed Jul 15, 2009 6:34 pm

Name: Pogue
Source: unca20091009.htm
Ronald Colman & Fredric Brown...an odd couple, but two of my favourites. Ah...Random Harvest, If I were King, The Light That Failed...among many others. Ah...The Far Cry, The Night of the Jabberwock, Screaming Mimi...among many others.

William Sherman
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 7:04 pm

Will Get My Kicks on Route 66

Postby William Sherman » Wed Jul 15, 2009 10:44 pm

Name: William Sherman
Source: unca20091007.htm
Dear Mr. Ellison et al.:

(With emphasis on the "et al.").

@KOS: Thanks so much for the recommendations for western leg of Route 66 run. Have noted in "Route 66" paper file I've begun. Looked up Amboy, CA, on Wikipedia: intriguing. Now, about those panties .....

Being an inmate of New England, never heard "Hour 25". Will explore, with emphasis on episodes hosted by a certain SFWA Grandmaster.

Enjoying one of the coolest Julys on record here in New England. Haven't turned on the central air conditioning once so far this month. Go La Nina.

To the State of California and your $26 billion deficit: good luck.

Regards from the other coast,

William Sherman
Boxford, MA





William Sherman
Posts: 88
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 7:04 pm

Will Get My Kicks on Route 66

Postby William Sherman » Wed Jul 15, 2009 10:44 pm

Name: William Sherman
Source: unca20091009.htm
Dear Mr. Ellison et al.:

(With emphasis on the "et al.").

@KOS: Thanks so much for the recommendations for western leg of Route 66 run. Have noted in "Route 66" paper file I've begun. Looked up Amboy, CA, on Wikipedia: intriguing. Now, about those panties .....

Being an inmate of New England, never heard "Hour 25". Will explore, with emphasis on episodes hosted by a certain SFWA Grandmaster.

Enjoying one of the coolest Julys on record here in New England. Haven't turned on the central air conditioning once so far this month. Go La Nina.

To the State of California and your $26 billion deficit: good luck.

Regards from the other coast,

William Sherman
Boxford, MA





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Samuel John Klein
Posts: 342
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 12:43 am
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Commuting

Postby Samuel John Klein » Thu Jul 16, 2009 1:41 am

Name: Samuel John Klein
Source: unca20091007.htm
I was just ruminating on "Commuter's Problem", and realized just what a Moebius strip of a story it is. The protagonist and the antagonist are really two sides of the same one-sided coin, just unknowingly at the end of a very very very long balance.

I loved the way the "alien" culture was just so, in its way, mundane and banal. And the way the main character wins through at the end just to get the same sort of grind in a different place, although he thinks he's out from under his old grind he actually has the same grind in a different, prittier place. So the whole story becomes an inversion there too, also.

@William Sherman: as a resident of the next state up the coast from Cali, I look upon the $26 Bil hole in California's wallet with trepidation and concern. After all, one of the first stops for any big trend out of California is my dear ancestral home of Oregon. While this can be a good thing (with respect to such things as mini skirts, music, and regulated substances), for other things well, not so much. And whatever happens in California goes nationwide eventually. A time to worry, my friend, for everyone.

At least we don't have an empty-headed Austrian ex-bodybuilder as Governor. I don't know how long that favor will hold us out, though.

As far as the weather, two or three times each summer a heat low gets bored around Sac'to and meanders up here for two or three days. We are in the middle of one of those visits now. Bliss.

Sam Klein
Living life in quiet desperation.

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Samuel John Klein
Posts: 342
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 12:43 am
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Commuting

Postby Samuel John Klein » Thu Jul 16, 2009 1:41 am

Name: Samuel John Klein
Source: unca20091009.htm
I was just ruminating on "Commuter's Problem", and realized just what a Moebius strip of a story it is. The protagonist and the antagonist are really two sides of the same one-sided coin, just unknowingly at the end of a very very very long balance.

I loved the way the "alien" culture was just so, in its way, mundane and banal. And the way the main character wins through at the end just to get the same sort of grind in a different place, although he thinks he's out from under his old grind he actually has the same grind in a different, prittier place. So the whole story becomes an inversion there too, also.

@William Sherman: as a resident of the next state up the coast from Cali, I look upon the $26 Bil hole in California's wallet with trepidation and concern. After all, one of the first stops for any big trend out of California is my dear ancestral home of Oregon. While this can be a good thing (with respect to such things as mini skirts, music, and regulated substances), for other things well, not so much. And whatever happens in California goes nationwide eventually. A time to worry, my friend, for everyone.

At least we don't have an empty-headed Austrian ex-bodybuilder as Governor. I don't know how long that favor will hold us out, though.

As far as the weather, two or three times each summer a heat low gets bored around Sac'to and meanders up here for two or three days. We are in the middle of one of those visits now. Bliss.

Sam Klein
Living life in quiet desperation.

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Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
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Routes 66 and 40

Postby Moderator » Thu Jul 16, 2009 2:58 am

Name: Steve Barber
Source: unca20091007.htm
WILLIAM - My buddy KOS is slightly confused. If you find yourself in Tucson you are well off the mark.

Highway 40 is the murderer of Route 66, and it crossed from Gallup, NM, through to FLAGSTAFF, not Tucson. It is between these two towns that you will find Barringer Crater (definitely wirth the stop) and the Painted Desert/Petrified Forest National Park -- also worth the extra hour or two.

After passing through Flagstaff and Williams you'll start seeing signs for Seligman. This is where you really ought to leave Highway 40 and take Rt 66 west. This portion travels from Seligman to Kingman and travels through some truly beautiful country (and watch for the Grand Canyon Caverns if you want a kitschy stop along the way).

Make sure you fill up on gas while in Needles. There's only one gas station between Needles and a town called Ludlow, and if you miss it and are low on gas it makes for some rather tense moments along the highway. KOS is right about Amboy. Check out Roy's, and then follow RT 66 across to Ludlow. It's a rough ride, but grandly desertlike and primeval. (Watch for the Amboy cinder cone on the left a few miles outside Amboy. Last erupted some 600 years ago...).

Enjoy the drive.
_______________________________________

Got word last night that Cris has a fun little PUBLIC gig at a new steak house in San Pedro. THINK PRIME, next Wednesday. More later.



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Moderator
Site Admin
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Routes 66 and 40

Postby Moderator » Thu Jul 16, 2009 2:58 am

Name: Steve Barber
Source: unca20091009.htm
WILLIAM - My buddy KOS is slightly confused. If you find yourself in Tucson you are well off the mark.

Highway 40 is the murderer of Route 66, and it crossed from Gallup, NM, through to FLAGSTAFF, not Tucson. It is between these two towns that you will find Barringer Crater (definitely wirth the stop) and the Painted Desert/Petrified Forest National Park -- also worth the extra hour or two.

After passing through Flagstaff and Williams you'll start seeing signs for Seligman. This is where you really ought to leave Highway 40 and take Rt 66 west. This portion travels from Seligman to Kingman and travels through some truly beautiful country (and watch for the Grand Canyon Caverns if you want a kitschy stop along the way).

Make sure you fill up on gas while in Needles. There's only one gas station between Needles and a town called Ludlow, and if you miss it and are low on gas it makes for some rather tense moments along the highway. KOS is right about Amboy. Check out Roy's, and then follow RT 66 across to Ludlow. It's a rough ride, but grandly desertlike and primeval. (Watch for the Amboy cinder cone on the left a few miles outside Amboy. Last erupted some 600 years ago...).

Enjoy the drive.
_______________________________________

Got word last night that Cris has a fun little PUBLIC gig at a new steak house in San Pedro. THINK PRIME, next Wednesday. More later.



sjarrett
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 8:43 pm
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
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Interstate 40

Postby sjarrett » Thu Jul 16, 2009 5:21 am

Name: Steve Jarrett
Source: unca20091007.htm
I live in North Carolina, and occasionally visit the city of Wilmington, the eastern terminus of Interstate 40. Just as the highway begins there is a standard highway distance sign that reads "Barstow, Calif. 2,554." Apparently there is a similar sign in Barstow indicating the distance to Wilmington. Who says the DOT doesn't have a sense of humor?

Steve J.

sjarrett
Posts: 113
Joined: Tue May 27, 2003 8:43 pm
Location: Winston-Salem, NC
Contact:

Interstate 40

Postby sjarrett » Thu Jul 16, 2009 5:21 am

Name: Steve Jarrett
Source: unca20091009.htm
I live in North Carolina, and occasionally visit the city of Wilmington, the eastern terminus of Interstate 40. Just as the highway begins there is a standard highway distance sign that reads "Barstow, Calif. 2,554." Apparently there is a similar sign in Barstow indicating the distance to Wilmington. Who says the DOT doesn't have a sense of humor?

Steve J.

steveperry
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:31 am

Route 66

Postby steveperry » Thu Jul 16, 2009 6:01 am

Name: Steve Perry
Source: unca20091007.htm
DIAL UP NELSON RIDDLE'S ROUTE 66 THEME

(http://www.nelsonriddlemusic.com/Nelson ... k%2003.mp3)

Along the way, you'll probably notice Route 66 museums. We stopped at two -- one in, I think, Kansas, and another in Oklahoma, both of which had Corvette convertibles in the parking lot. Worth doing.

I think the Giant Rabbit Farm is long-gone -- I can remember signs for that on the southern route to L.A. from Baton Rouge fifty years ago. "Only 1800 miles to the Giant Rabbit Farm!" Never knew if the rabbits were giants, or the farm ...

Burma Shave signs are mostly gone, too ...

Have a good trip. Take your time and enjoy it. It's not about the destination, it's about the ride ...

steveperry
Posts: 94
Joined: Tue Jul 14, 2009 11:31 am

Route 66

Postby steveperry » Thu Jul 16, 2009 6:01 am

Name: Steve Perry
Source: unca20091009.htm
DIAL UP NELSON RIDDLE'S ROUTE 66 THEME

(http://www.nelsonriddlemusic.com/Nelson ... k%2003.mp3)

Along the way, you'll probably notice Route 66 museums. We stopped at two -- one in, I think, Kansas, and another in Oklahoma, both of which had Corvette convertibles in the parking lot. Worth doing.

I think the Giant Rabbit Farm is long-gone -- I can remember signs for that on the southern route to L.A. from Baton Rouge fifty years ago. "Only 1800 miles to the Giant Rabbit Farm!" Never knew if the rabbits were giants, or the farm ...

Burma Shave signs are mostly gone, too ...

Have a good trip. Take your time and enjoy it. It's not about the destination, it's about the ride ...

Richard Cohen

Postby Richard Cohen » Thu Jul 16, 2009 6:15 am

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091007.htm
A lot of 1970s (& some 1960s) performances of stage plays have come onto dvd
(many on the Kultur label) and they're showing up at the local public library ---
maybe yours too, which is why I mention it now.

Surprising how many of these plays I remember seeing at the time.
One I missed originally (though I remember the fanfare around it) was "The Andersonville Trial"
(Image Entertainment) which features Wm. Shatner, relying too much on 'technique' in the negative sense ---
the automatic, bag-of-tricks routine type performing which made him subject to sneers and charges of over-acting
over the years. Such dismissal wasn't entirely fair (especially with regard to Star Trek's challenges)
but still your degree of tolerance for Shatner's vintage-1970 habits might determine how involved
you can get in the Andersonville play. On the other hand, mannerisms aren't out of place for the suasive,
presentational role of the prosecuting Judge Advocate, so there's that.

Anyway: high-minded drama ---- take note if you will. (Cast is crammed with familiar TV faces,
by the way: even the non-speaking roles are filled by them.)

Richard

Richard Cohen

Postby Richard Cohen » Thu Jul 16, 2009 6:15 am

Name: Richard Cohen
Source: unca20091009.htm
A lot of 1970s (& some 1960s) performances of stage plays have come onto dvd
(many on the Kultur label) and they're showing up at the local public library ---
maybe yours too, which is why I mention it now.

Surprising how many of these plays I remember seeing at the time.
One I missed originally (though I remember the fanfare around it) was "The Andersonville Trial"
(Image Entertainment) which features Wm. Shatner, relying too much on 'technique' in the negative sense ---
the automatic, bag-of-tricks routine type performing which made him subject to sneers and charges of over-acting
over the years. Such dismissal wasn't entirely fair (especially with regard to Star Trek's challenges)
but still your degree of tolerance for Shatner's vintage-1970 habits might determine how involved
you can get in the Andersonville play. On the other hand, mannerisms aren't out of place for the suasive,
presentational role of the prosecuting Judge Advocate, so there's that.

Anyway: high-minded drama ---- take note if you will. (Cast is crammed with familiar TV faces,
by the way: even the non-speaking roles are filled by them.)

Richard


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