Pavilion Digest: February 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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BrianSiano
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Apropos of Diane and others

Postby BrianSiano » Sat Feb 28, 2009 5:27 pm

Name: Brian Siano
Source: unca20090314.htm
This reminds me of... well, too many conversations to remember, actually.

Here's one. I was on the local comics shop, and I mentioned my age since it was my birthday that day. The clerk had to ask me something. My age meant that I saw the first _Star Wars_ movie as a teenager, so he asked me what that was like-- seeing it not as a _child_, who could be overwhelmed, but as a semi-adult, with some critical ability. I said I liked it a lot when I saw it, but even then I didn't think it was the _greatest_ SF movie ever made. For me, that was (and still is) _2001_. The other clerk couldn't understand why I'd put any movie above _Star Wars_, so I said, "Ever see _Lawrence of Arabia_?" Guy shook his head.

That happens a lot. I start talking to someone, and they mention something that they really, really like. And they ask me if I like it. And I never see the point of lying about whether I liked a book or film or not, so I say, politely and sometimes apologetically, that I didn't like it.

I get the same thing when someone tells me about something they like. I say, "You like that? Oh, man, then you should check out X or read Y or watch Z." And people tell me that this makes other people feel _stupid_ because they didn't know about these other things.

I can understand this, because when I'm talking to someone smarter than I am (and that's a lot of people), I'm trying to ask questions that don't seem too stupid. And if I'm un informed about something, well, I _feel_ bad because I don't know about it, but I remind myself that I can't be expected to know everything.

But that's just about information. When it comes to art and what affects us, it's trickier. I think Harlan once said that he wasn't very enthusiastic about Carl Hiassen's novels because they seemed like tepid reflections of the greatness of Donald E. Westlake. But a lot of Hiassen's fans have never heard of Westlake (I know, it's a fucking sin), and I wouldn't begrudge them the joy they've received.

Sometimes something really trite and mawkish can hit us at just the right time, and at the right angle, to shake us in a profound way. Or, let's say you encounter some ideas you've never encountered before, and you find them compelling... but the person who brought those idea to you isn't a very good writer. Or there are better writers out there who've done far better work.

So Diane read Kahlil Ghibran and found him deep and meaningful. That's fine. But Diane, don't be upset that Harlan (or anyone else) points out that Ghibran wasn't exactly without precedent, and may not be as nuanced or as keen as another writer. It's perfectly possible. I won't say there's _no_ shame in being affected by a particular writer's work (anyone who says they were moved to tears by _Forrest Gump_ deserves a third Bush term), but don't take it so personally. Check out Omar Khayyam.









DTS
Posts: 197
Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2009 12:04 am

Cindy's, er, um, "revealing" post

Postby DTS » Sat Feb 28, 2009 6:21 pm

Name: DTS
Source: unca20090314.htm
CINDY: Personally, _I_ would NEVER have admitted to reading (and enjoyoing) THE PROPHET...nor would I have admitted to, you know, being a Republican...or enjoying the "film" (I use that term loosely) "White Chicks"...or tapping my feet and singing along everytime I hear the song, "Sugar, Sugar" -- ah, FUCK! Now you have ME doing it!!!

Love and kisses from the otherside of the world,
DTS


paul
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Joined: Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:04 pm
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The rest of the story....

Postby paul » Sat Feb 28, 2009 10:08 pm

Name: Paul
Source: unca20090314.htm
Diane,
What everyone here has said, times six. Now that we're all copping to an honesty bordering on felonious, I will just say that I have a stack of books in the bookshelf that I keep as a 'bad example department'. I have been told in no uncertain terms that I am doomed to perdition, that I should be so lucky to live my life in durance vile, that I am a living abortion, that I am unworthy to set pen to paper, because within that stack are "On The Road", "A Separate Peace", and others I dare not mention now. We all like what we like. Or as I put it at work- "Taste has no price." I'm just glad this little nook is here that we may discuss our likes and dislikes, not to enrage or savage another, but to freely exchange opinions in this 'marketplace of ideas', without an asinine jackhammering from trolls with nothing better to do.

Hell, just LOOKING at the Science vs. Religion board is enough to convince anyone that his group is the politest bunch of malcontents this side of the Andes, even when the discussion is spoke from polar opposites.
~~~~~~~

RH #47 received here as well. Just so you don't think it was a total wash-out, Harlan, I got the joke.
~~~~~~~

B. Siano~ Yeah, that's right on. Although what I do hate is what Harlan termed 'ignorant stupidity'- in this case, not knowing something and getting defensive because they don't.

I'll be talking and make a reference to something... Andy Warhol and Studio 54, say.... and if there's a younger person, I'll simply ask if they know what I'm referring to. There are a lot of smart and history savvy kids out there. There also are many, not. My younger friends will say, "Yes, I think so." or "Nope, not a clue.", a prevailing honesty that is refreshing.

It grates to hear somebody, kid or grown-up, say, "Now, why the hell would I know THAT? I wasn't even born yet!"

Well, fuck son, I wasn't born when Caruso was performing either, but I know of his singing.

THAT is capital A-nnoying.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On another note, the great voice of Paul Harvey has been silenced. Man, I loved to hear him talk.
And, you know what? My mom couldn't stand him.





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