Pavilion Digest: April 2003

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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robochrist
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Postby robochrist » Wed Apr 23, 2003 5:00 pm

Name: Rob
Source: unca20030523.htm
Ben,

I inferred from your name you were a big guy. "BEN" is a BIG name. ANYONE with the name Ben is inevitably BIG. It is a BIG, genetically inescapable given.

Frank,

If Chris were truly elitist he would leap into the well of Lang's work, along with Hitchcock, Wilder, and Sturges.

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Cindy
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Postby Cindy » Wed Apr 23, 2003 6:47 pm

Name: Cindy
Source: unca20030523.htm
I love Shatterday-- but somebody stole my autographed personalized copy, along with my Godbody by Ted Sturgeon (given to me by Ed for my 29th birthday).


I hope Harlan and Susan are well now-- thus providing yet another fine example of the miraculous benefit of dutiful Lutheran prayer.

:)

Cindy


P.A. Berman

Two Questions

Postby P.A. Berman » Wed Apr 23, 2003 7:12 pm

Name: P.A. Berman
Source: unca20030523.htm
Hey everyone. Hope you all had a festive holiday celebrating whatever rites of Spring you prefer.

First, to Harlan, re: his flu. Three years ago I had a fever for 13 days that wouldn't go away, along with other lovely flu-like symptoms. After two visits to the emergency room, someone finally gave me TamiFlu, which is an anti-viral specifically designed to fight the flu bug. The fever broke and I was 100% better in 36 hours. If you're still suffering, you might ask your doctor about this medication.

Also, I have two questions for everyone:

1. How can I get a copy of the movie "A Boy and His Dog"? None of the video stores around me have it, it seems. Would you call it "appropriate" for high school seniors? Unlike some other academians, I would have the kids read the story and THEN see the movie...

2. I am going to run a series of informal writers' workshops in Ithaca this summer and I was wondering if anyone knew of a book that has writing games in it; stuff like Exquisite Corpse, and ways to get the creative juices flowing in a workshop environment. Any help would be appreciated. Also, if you happen to know of a good writing game yourself, I'd love to hear about it either here or via e-mail.

Thanks,
PAB

Eric Martin
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Postby Eric Martin » Wed Apr 23, 2003 7:37 pm

Name: Eric Martin
Source: unca20030523.htm
P.A., no, it's not appropriate for high school seniors.

I can think of about a dozen other Ellison works that would work for a high school English class. They may not have films made of them, but they would be more rewarding as literature, and more suitable for a teenage readership. "A Boy and his Dog" is neither.


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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Wed Apr 23, 2003 8:56 pm

Name: David Loftus
Source: unca20030523.htm
People have been talking about errors in books, especially King's. Jon Stover mentioned:

> King does get sloppy sometimes -- it'd be a
> wonder if he didn't. My favourite non-nitpick
> involves The Stand. In the book, the general
> mispronounces Yeats as "Yeets." A
> subordinate realizes this but doesn't
> comment on it. In the miniseries, the
> general (played by Ed Harris) mispronounces
> Yeats as well, leading at least one reviewer
> I read to comment 'How are we supposed to
> take this series seriously when the creators
> don't even know how to pronounce 'Yeats'?'
> Grr. Arr.

I'm no King fan, but I dip into a book or two of his now and then to keep tabs on what the rest of America is reading. _Thinner_ pissed me off because it misquotes T.S. Eliot's "Ash Wednesday," which is easy to look up. I noticed a screaming error or typo in _The Stand_ as well (at least the early paperback version with the mostly black cover). Clapton's late Sixties power trio was identified as "Creem." Sorry guys: Creem is the rock magazine. Clapton's band was simple Cream.

All of this naturally recalls Ellison's rant, recounted in one of the Glass Teat columns, when an actor doing one of his early 1960s scripts mispronounced a certain French existential author as "KAM-uss."


csjlong
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Postby csjlong » Wed Apr 23, 2003 10:05 pm

Name: Chris L
Source: unca20030523.htm
Frank,

Sling Blade is pretty good. I enjoyed it a lot when I saw it though it wouldn't be on my all-time top list. Gotta love any movie with a Jarmusch cameo.

Rob,

Of course I love Fritz Lang. What rational being doesn't? Just watched the Kino Dr. Mabuse DVD again the other night - I dare anyone to tell me modern Hollywood spectacle has EXCEEDED what Lang achieved there or in Metropolis. Or for that matter what Murnau achieved in Sunrise and Faust. I ain't even talking content here, just visuals. Anyone wanna tell me Armageddon looks better than Faust? Huh? C'mon, I dare ya!

Wilder and Sturges are indeed both great but neither is really a personal favorite. They come from a more theatrical tradition that doesn't interest me as much on a personal level. Of course, Sunset Boulevard and Double Indemnity are both masterpieces and personal faves.



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Hathor
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King Errors

Postby Hathor » Wed Apr 23, 2003 11:05 pm

Name: Hathor
Source: unca20030523.htm
They are interesting to find just for the simple reason that it is NOT in the short-story format, so errors are easier to miss.

This is the text equivalent of watching a prop disappear and reappear in a big-budget movie. It just means someone not doing their job, not that there is a deliberate malice behind spotting these. It's kind of like why medical personnel I know hardly ever watch "ER".

Belive me, one bad copy editor can ruin your whole day.

(I leave the malice for CSI. Oh, Thank God The CRIME LAB'S HERE! Right.)

BrianSiano
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Postby BrianSiano » Thu Apr 24, 2003 4:04 am

Name: Brian Siano
Source: unca20030523.htm
David Loftus wrote:

"All of this naturally recalls Ellison's rant, recounted in one of the Glass Teat columns, when an actor doing one of his early 1960s scripts mispronounced a certain French existential author as "KAM-uss.""

Jesus, David, get yer facts straight. Harlan spelled it as "CAY-muss."




Couldn't resist.

John K

Postby John K » Thu Apr 24, 2003 4:39 am

Name: John K
Source: unca20030523.htm
Chris L--

I'm probably revealing myself as a philistine, but I genuinely disliked Fritz Lang's METROPOLIS.

I understand that it's important historically. The audacity and vision are more than astonishing, even now. But it seems so far removed from anything human.

I'll take M over it any day of the week.

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Cindy
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Postby Cindy » Thu Apr 24, 2003 4:42 am

Name: Cindy
Source: unca20030523.htm


Frank,
I loved Sling Blade-- in particular the work of Dwight Yoakum. His inspired performance personified white trash on a level that hasn't been approached since Shelley Winters appeared in A Patch Of Blue. It also gave keen insight into the statement by Sharon Stone who once said dating Yoakum was like "eating a dirt sandwich." He is fascinating to watch and almost criminally overlooked as an actor.

Yes, Frank- Sling Blade WAS one of the most artful and revealing films in recent times. We are fortunate indeed that the powers that be at Shooting Gallery took a chance on Billy Bob and gave him a free rein. Conversely, I though Monster's Ball was over the top. The theme was solid but I sincerely wanted to send Halley Berry to Overactors Annonymous. Monster's Ball was remarkable only for its humpty scene which (for me) was just high dollar porn. I ENJOYED watching it, mind you-- but only for carnal reasons.

If I (CAPITOL "I")were to cast Monster's Ball I would have set Queen Latifah or Whoopie Goldberg in Halley Berry's role. Don't give me the obvious. Of COURSE Thornton's character would be smitten with Berry-- what mortal man WOULDN'T be? She's friggin' exquisite. Nope,nothing gritty or inspiring about ANY man falling off the bigot wagon for HALLEY BERRY.

What the HELL was up with that Best Actress award?

:)
YER PAL,
Cindy



Hey David,

Welcome home! Did you get my email?
:)
Cindy



Hello Gary Wallen!
:)

Cindy


Justin,
Don't RIDE those things! They're DANGEROUS!!!SOO glad you survived and looking forward to your next flim school narration.

:)
Cindy

Hey Lynn!

Hey Faisal!

Hiya Chuck!

Rich,
Get video of the baby's awkward gait NOW-- she'll be running around a track in high school shortly and you'll have forgotten her John Wayne number.

:)
Cindy

Eric Martin
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Posts: 546
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Postby Eric Martin » Thu Apr 24, 2003 5:23 am

Name: Eric Martin
Source: unca20030523.htm
Rumor has it, and as rumors go it's fairly grounded, that Billy Bob has one of the biggest wangs in Hollywood.

Well, that's MY post for the day.

lynn
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Slate Article on Travelling With Mark Twain

Postby lynn » Thu Apr 24, 2003 6:46 am

Name: Lynn
Source: unca20030523.htm
http://slate.msn.com/id/2081491/entry/0/

Michael Zuzel

Postby Michael Zuzel » Thu Apr 24, 2003 7:43 am

Name: Michael Zuzel
Source: unca20030523.htm
Harlan is the main focus of, and was interviewed for, a review of "McSweeney's Mammoth Treasury of Thrilling Tales" in today's Seattle Times:

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/a ... son24.html

ZUZ

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robochrist
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Postby robochrist » Thu Apr 24, 2003 8:06 am

Name: Rob
Source: unca20030523.htm
Chris,

I'm glad to hear you say that about Lang (although you still have to account for the other bros I listed); I wondered about it because I discussed him several times here before and you never had a response. I do remember your own discussions of F.W. Murnau. Though I place Lang above him I cannot deny the power of Nosferatu, The Golem, and the seminal Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. They are the only films of his I've seen, but they remain extremely important to me.

He who makes the rules gets all the gold: Lang created SO many templates for modern cinema, not just in style but in substance.

It was the three Mabuse films - the inescapable psychic tendrils of Mabuse stretching through society - (the last Lang directed in 1960) that utterly blew me away in their sophistication and naturalism.

Dr. Mabuse the Gambler was inspired by Al Capone and foreshadowed the rise of Adolph Hitler. But it was The Testament of Dr. Mabuse - the most recent film I'd seen - that got Lang in trouble with the Nazis, with its parallels to the behavior of the Nazi thugs employed to consolidate their power early on. Nevertheless, the Mabuse films were a raging success financially, artistically, and in their modern influences.

Turning back, Metropolis, more remembered today than any of his other films, was actually a financial flop in its day. Did you know that? It nearly bankrupted the company, as Cleopatra did for Fox in the 60's.

I also saw Siegfried (in two parts), Spiders (a forebearer of Indiana Jones), Destiny (had it not been for which, it could be argued, we never would have had a Bunuel!), obviously M. M was an incredible experience for me.

I have as yet to see The Woman in the Moon; it has, according to what I've read, an ominously modern rocket launch sequence (because of the German rocket experts at the time) but an inversely absurd depiction of the moon when astronauts land there. I put it off more or less for that reason. But because of its historical importance I do want to look at it at some point.

I said this in an earlier entry but all the films Lang did in Germany far surpass his entire output in America (even Fury, which I consider his best here). For some reason when he came over here he seemed to downplay the dynamic, Expressionistic visual style that marked all his German films. Even the distinct lighting was gone. The voice of a social conscience was still there - and HE was the one truly responsible for triggering the Noir cycle (yet ANOTHER area traced to him) - but that beautiful distinct look was gone.

Assuming you haven't, you really ought to dig deep into those other guys as well. As with Lang, I've seen ALL but one or two of Hitchcock's films (those exceptions were silents), read about his background, countless interviews, and about his influences as an artist.

I've seen about two-thirds of Wilder's output; same for Sturges.

Bubba's Sister

Postby Bubba's Sister » Thu Apr 24, 2003 9:07 am

Name: Bubba's Sister
Source: unca20030523.htm
Regarding the article in the Seattle Times and Mr Ellison's comments in it on the decline of literacy...

I have reason to believe that there might be something to Mr Ellison's allegations. To wit, recently a certain young man went lookking for a copy of "Don Quixote" from his school's library,
and was asked by the book janitor (no one could rightly describe her as a librarian) if it was a new novel. She wasn't familiar with the title. This is a true story.



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