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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:17 am

Geez, you gals are scary.

I never was much of a fan of "The Whimper of Whipped Dogs," but I think it was more for story structural reasons than actual content.

And Paul, my god, why would you share THOSE two aloud with a friend? His reaction was entirely predictable; I'm surprised he DID go ahead and read more HE. I'd introduce a newbie to Ellison with something more characteristic of his work -- that is, vivid but also FUN, like Repent, Harlequin or "The 3 Most Important Things in Life."

Ease 'em into it. Then you can read them "The Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World," like I did to my grandmother when I was 16 and she was 70.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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FinderDoug
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Postby FinderDoug » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:49 am

Frank spaketh:
Doug, find my AI review. I'm lazy..hehe.


Hmm.

That would require enough of a residual interest in AI to seek out a review at this late date.

That would also require enough of a residual interest in your thoughts on AI.

I'm not lazy. I'm selective. :) *smoochles*

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Duane
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Postby Duane » Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:17 am

Welcome.... what was your name again? Dungeon Master? No... (just kidding)...

My first intro to Harlan was Dangerous Visions. His introductions, to be exact. I loved them so much I sought out more of his work.

As such things go, I was 14 at the time, and when my Mom found my copies of DV and Robert Silverberg's Son of Man lying around, she happened to open them up and read them. Oops.

.... It took me a week to find where she had hidden them.

ps. Hope everyone had a Merry Everything. Anyone else drive 1900 miles in 9 days to visit friends and family? (LA to Mesa, AZ to Snowflake, AZ to SLC and back). I don't plan on driving for a month.

paul
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Postby paul » Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:39 am

Yeeaah.. sometimes subtlety is not my color.

Remember, I learned to swim by my uncle tossing me in the deep side of the river at age 7.

I think it was one of those, "Oh, I havent heard of him at all. He can't be that good." -- "Oh, yeah?" -- kinda moments.
The medium is the message.

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Postby Moderator » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:05 am

Duane wrote:My first intro to Harlan was Dangerous Visions. His introductions, to be exact. I loved them so much I sought out more of his work.


Interesting. This produced a flashback in my own skull that A,DV's intros probably served as my own first exposure. I may be relatively alone in this, but introductions seem to intrigue me more than the stories themselves do. I'm drawn to the thoughts and comments made by the writer/editor/guest commentator because it's a little like getting a behind the scenes view into the process.

Don't get me wrong, I love the stories. But inevitably I will read and enjoy the introductions (in Harlan's books as well as other collections) before I sample even one of the items being collected.

Duane wrote:Anyone else drive 1900 miles in 9 days to visit friends and family? (LA to Mesa, AZ to Snowflake, AZ to SLC and back). I don't plan on driving for a month.


Don't blame you. I've drive cross-country twice myself, and four other times with other people in the car. Five to seven day trips. Ugh.

Relax. Sleep.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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The Dreaded Slaymaker
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Postby The Dreaded Slaymaker » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:12 am

Duane wrote: Anyone else drive 1900 miles in 9 days to visit friends and family? (LA to Mesa, AZ to Snowflake, AZ to SLC and back). I don't plan on driving for a month.


I can't quite claim that, but I did drive 1100 miles in 5 days (Northern Vermont to west of Philadelphia and back). I do it so often, though, that it doesn't seem that bad to me.

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:46 am

Cannot claim 1900 miles, but I did once drive 1,200 miles from Mpls to Philly in one trip straight through, with only two stops for a bathroom break and to get some hot food. Took me 20 hours and I was hallucinating that the trees were monsters out of a Lovecraftian story by the end
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Wed Dec 31, 2008 11:48 am

Mark, much love my Jewish friend, but you need to read as much Norman Finkelstein as possible.

Kiss for my propagandized bubbala.

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Postby Moderator » Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:20 pm

FrankChurch wrote:you need to read as much Norman Finkelstein as possible.



Mark, best I can gather, he was Dharma's father on Dharma and Greg.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:29 pm

haha.

Mark doesn't like us WASPS, don't force our culture on him. haha.

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:42 pm

I am dating a WASP (actually a Lutheran, but all you goyim look alike to me) so the claim I don't like ya is not a valid one.

Norman Finkelstein, I think I know him. Might be my mother's cousin, twice removed, or maybe was my Dad's brother in law's uncle......

Random yiddish word of the day: machitanum (not sure of the spelling but the pronunciation is machhh-i-tane-um), the relationship between in-laws; originally, although not specifically, meant to refer to the relationship between the parents of spouses (Steve's parents to Cris' for example). I swear there are some things that can only be said in Yiddish.......
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Postby Moderator » Wed Dec 31, 2008 1:32 pm

markabaddon wrote:I am dating a WASP (actually a Lutheran, but all you goyim look alike to me) so the claim I don't like ya is not a valid one.


Heck, I'm not able to differentiate between Hollywood actors. Cris is constantly correcting whether that's Kyle Chandler, Lee Pace or Michael Imperioli I'm watching.

(Never had a problem recognizing Chi McBride for some reason.)

markabaddon wrote:Random yiddish word of the day: machitanum (not sure of the spelling but the pronunciation is machhh-i-tane-um), the relationship between in-laws; originally, although not specifically, meant to refer to the relationship between the parents of spouses (Steve's parents to Cris' for example).


Huh. We call them "Out-Laws" where I come from...
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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The Dreaded Slaymaker
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Postby The Dreaded Slaymaker » Wed Dec 31, 2008 10:33 pm

In my family they call themselves the out-laws. In self-defense. I have a very large extended family, and the out-laws have to deal with first, second and third cousins as well and once and twice removed. It's a little daunting.

paul
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Postby paul » Fri Jan 02, 2009 10:38 pm

Barber wrote:
Duane wrote:My first intro to Harlan was Dangerous Visions. His introductions, to be exact. I loved them so much I sought out more of his work.


Interesting. This produced a flashback in my own skull that A,DV's intros probably served as my own first exposure. I may be relatively alone in this, but introductions seem to intrigue me more than the stories themselves do. I'm drawn to the thoughts and comments made by the writer/editor/guest commentator because it's a little like getting a behind the scenes view into the process.

Don't get me wrong, I love the stories. But inevitably I will read and enjoy the introductions (in Harlan's books as well as other collections) before I sample even one of the items being collected.


This is all true. However, I am forever grateful for DV and ADV for introducing me to Carol Emshwiller, whom I will stand foursquare with against all literary criticism. She is an unique monumental force of nature, and an iron fist in a velvet glove, and one hell of an evocative writer.

I was gifted this christmas with two books, by my Love who knows not Carol's talent, only her name. Report To The Men's Club, which may be my favorite and The Mount which I have yet to read.
The medium is the message.


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