Yes, she's back....

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Fri Dec 19, 2008 3:09 pm

FinderDoug wrote:David - looks like you first posted in April, 2001, but I'm certain you were supplying Rick with reviews well before that.



Yes, Deathbird Stories was the first I summarized and critiqued in the Bibliography wing for Rick, and the date on that is June 2000.

I did a Google search for alt.fan.harlan-ellison, which I remember being a lively little group in the mid 1990s before trolls brought it to a screeching halt: I recall getting the news about the quadruple bypass there (1996?), and a discussion of Kafka's and Ellison's wishes to have all their unfinished work destroyed upon their deaths. I can recall being pretty active on that Usenet group, but all Google turned up were a handful of posts in December 1997, which I can tell were pretty late in the game, so apparently that's all dead and buried.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Lori Koonce
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Postby Lori Koonce » Fri Dec 19, 2008 4:00 pm

Ms. Slaymaker

May I make one small request?

Aside from me there is only one other female who posts here with anything that can be called regularity. I'm choking on all the testosterone in the air.

So, as often as you can, please post. We need all the estrogen we can get in these here parts.

And as far as our Frankie goes, he's a good example of "bark being worse than bite"

Lori

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Fri Dec 19, 2008 4:05 pm

The Frankie love lottery takes all comers, even newbies.

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markabaddon
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Postby markabaddon » Fri Dec 19, 2008 4:14 pm

What do you mean there is not enough women, doesn't Frank count (his real name is Irma) :twisted:

Welcome Ms. Slaymaker
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

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Lori Koonce
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Postby Lori Koonce » Fri Dec 19, 2008 5:32 pm

markabaddon wrote:What do you mean there is not enough women, doesn't Frank count (his real name is Irma) :twisted: r


MTF dosen't do it for me Mark. *S*

Besides, if Frankie is REAL girl, she's a little more butch than I'm willing to deal with!
Life, love and all the chocolate you can eat

Lori

purplelynn35@gmail.com

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The Dreaded Slaymaker
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Postby The Dreaded Slaymaker » Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:16 pm

Lori, I am happy to post as often as I can. I am a strong believer in balance.

Deathbird Stories is and probably will remain my favorite anthology. I remember reading the "caution" in the beginning, about not reading without taking a break between stories - I am a fast reader and tend to devour books, so I huffed and said "yeah, sure, Harlan" - and then found myself, after each story, having to stop and take a breath. "The Deathbird" made me cry a lot (but then, I do cry easily). The one story of Harlan's, though, that truly speaks to me is "Adrift Just Off the Islands of Langerhans...". When Larry Talbot found that Howdy Doody button, I got it. And it changed me.

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Lori Koonce
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Postby Lori Koonce » Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:31 pm

I knew there was a reason I liked you so quickly slaymaker.

My all time favorite HE story is from that book. Try explaining to HE fans why you adore The Wimper of Whipped Dogs. if you really thrive on frustration, try explaining to the neophyte why you like it so much.

I've lived in a major city for over 8 years now, and every day it's a struggle not to sell my soul to the nameless mass that is the city.
Life, love and all the chocolate you can eat



Lori



purplelynn35@gmail.com

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The Dreaded Slaymaker
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Postby The Dreaded Slaymaker » Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:54 pm

Yes! I also loved Whimper of Whipped Dogs. I lived in center city Philadelphia when I was in my 20's, and loved it at first - but finally got freaked out by the succession of young men hanging out on the fire escape outside my bedroom window.

I was almost old enough to be aware of the Kitty Genovese murder - 1965, right? I was 9 - but there was also a Movie-of-the-Week a couple of years later that told the story, so I know whereof Harlan wrote. The story always terrified me.

Alan Coil
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Postby Alan Coil » Sat Dec 20, 2008 8:49 pm

Slaymaker--

Re: mucking stalls

What a delightful memory your have brought forth in my feeble mind. There was nothing I hated more than going outside on cold winter mornings to muck stalls, but if there was anything that made it tolerable, it was the beauty of freshly fallen snow tinted to a gentle blue by the approaching dawn. It was as if I had walked into a scene from a postcard, or Currier and Ives.

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The Dreaded Slaymaker
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Re: Mucking Stalls

Postby The Dreaded Slaymaker » Sat Dec 20, 2008 10:11 pm

Alan - yes, I have to say, as much as I hate really cold weather (and why does she live in Vermont, he asks? It's complicated...), those winter mornings are my favorites. It's so quiet, and somehow even more lovely than during the summer. And I really love Vermont summers...

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The Dreaded Slaymaker
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Postby The Dreaded Slaymaker » Sun Dec 21, 2008 9:25 am

One more benefit of mucking stalls in the winter...clear sinuses...

paul
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Postby paul » Mon Dec 29, 2008 11:17 pm

I wanted to read a story to friend of mine who'd never read HE. I warned him that it was a bit hard to swallow, and was dangerously close to thinking. He said, "Go ahead." I read out loud, in succession, The Whimper of Whipped Dogs and Bleeding Stones.

After I finished, he said, direct quote,
"Don't ever read me anything by him, ever again, please. I can't take it."

He subsequently purchased books and took them very, very slowly.
The medium is the message.

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:24 am

Harlan's like crack, one puff and it's happy camper time.

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Postby Moderator » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:03 am

Yeow Paul, and I thought you were such a gentle soul.

I think I would have introduced him a bit more slowly. Perhaps "Prince Myshkin" or "Djinn, No Chaser".

If you were going for blood, why didn't you just read him IHNMAIMS, getting it over with quickly and in one swift, single-slice to the jugular movement???
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Dec 30, 2008 11:17 am

A Boy And His Dog would have been a good start.


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