David Loftus redux

Introduce yourself here. One post per person. Use replies to those to discuss someone.

Moderator: Moderator

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:00 pm

I watched the episode at the home of a friend who had a featured supporting role -- the wife of the second villain, the tough guy who kidnaps the Luke Perry character. I'm acquainted with several of the other small speaking parts in this episode as well -- the guy in Perry's studio audience who says "That's my Dad!" and his plant in the line outside who obtains background information on the studio guests -- saw her in a couple sketches on a local stage last week.

In the first two instances I described above, the footage moved too fast for me to catch anything. If and when I get a DVD copy, I'll be able to freeze the frames and see whether I might just be detectable in them.

But in the third situation -- the outdoor coffee shop scenes, mostly with Perry and Ryan -- you can definitely catch my lavender shirt and the back of my head. Carole said I turned it once in profile, but I missed that.

Watch for the season finale -- "The Maltese Falcon Job" on February 17 -- when I may just be recognizable facing the camera, as an illegal arms dealer in mustache and beard on the deck of a ship and down in the cargo hold.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:12 pm

By the way, my friend Lisamarie had a couple fun Luke Perry stories. He didn't have his lines down for his scene, while she of course had all hers memorized. So the conversation had to be filmed in short segments in which she delivered her line, then they reset the cameras on him so he could read his lines off a card held up by a production assistant. On the other hand, she said he was warm and gracious to her; during my shoot, he was the only star to acknowledge our existence as extras at the tables around him and thanked us for being there.

Her best story concerned her first exposure to Perry, however. She was called at 9 a.m. to get hair and costuming done, but her shoot wasn't scheduled until 4:30 p.m. She didn't even know Perry was going to be in the episode. She was having lunch with the actor who plays her husband in the episode when he called, "Hey, Lukie -- over here." She about fell out of her chair when Luke Perry sat down opposite her. He was shy and giving all his attention to his lunch while her "husband" chatted her up. The guy expressed surprise that she had a 28-year-old son (I think she's a flirty, leggy 48 with big, currly black hair), and she said, oh yes, in fact her son has two boys -- she's a grandmother.

At that, Perry choked on his food, and blurted, "No fucking way! You're too hot to be a grandmother!"

We all thought she should put that on her resume and Facebook page.

This weekend, I'm participating in a weekend-long "Leverage Boot Camp" which the local casting agency is running to prepare local talent to audition for and work on the third season's episodes. The show eats through a lot of walk-ons, so the odds are really good that I'll get a speaking part this year (especially since I no longer have that beard and mustache).

And yes, Doug, "Coup de Theatre" hit its funding goal! Thanks for your help. (I pledged some money on the last day or so under my pseudonym.) I'm scheduled to shoot my scenes on the weekend of Feb. 13-14.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:17 pm
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby Moderator » Fri Feb 05, 2010 1:42 pm

This kind of begs an interesting question, David.

Over the years Cris and I have known a number of actors who have had roles in various TV shows. For some reason, the novelty has never rubbed off, and invariably we're both jolted out of the show/movie by the appearance of our friend. (Doesn't happen on stage for some reason.)

What is your experience when seeing either yourself or your friends under these conditions? Does it shake the reverie, or can you stay "in-story"?
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Sat Feb 06, 2010 12:44 am

Barber wrote:This kind of begs an interesting question, David.

Over the years Cris and I have known a number of actors who have had roles in various TV shows. For some reason, the novelty has never rubbed off, and invariably we're both jolted out of the show/movie by the appearance of our friend. (Doesn't happen on stage for some reason.)

What is your experience when seeing either yourself or your friends under these conditions? Does it shake the reverie, or can you stay "in-story"?



Well, I'm not sure I can answer precisely, because I've never been surprised by the appearance of a friend in a show. Usually, I'm watching precisely to SEE that particular friend in the show, which puts a whole different spin on it.

The closest thing I can think of to what you're describing was seeing Chris(tian) Clemenson as the "let's roll" passenger in _United 93_ after not having seen him for many, many years (he played an assistant producer in "Broadcast News"), and running across James Bundy as a drug dealer in an episode of "Law & Order." These were two noted actors in college at roughly the same time I was -- I saw them both on stage in school, long ago. And yes, it jolted me out of the story a bit to see them, initially, and then it was back to the story. But I never knew them well and hadn't had any contact with them in years.

When I see someone I know better or more recently, such as the folks in this week's episode of "Leverage," it pretty much stops being about the story -- or being totally inside it, anyway -- and becomes a celebration of their mere appearance in a primo job, and how well they do their bit in it.

By the way, I'll be spending my entire weekend -- 9 to 6, both days -- in a "Leverage Boot Camp" organized by the main casting agency in town to prepare local talent to audition for and work in the show during its third season shoot this spring and summer. Aldis Hodge ("Alec Hardison" the hacker) is supposed to join the show's creators for panel discussions.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:17 pm
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby Moderator » Sat Feb 06, 2010 10:10 am

Thanks for the response, David. Have a fun weekend. "Break a spleen" or whatever it is you actors say...

(Or, as I was once instructed when working as a supernumerary with the San Diego Opera: "En Boca Lupo".)
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

User avatar
Jan
Posts: 1817
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:25 pm
Location: Köln

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby Jan » Sat Feb 06, 2010 2:20 pm

Being an extra or bit player is an interesting experience as you're both inside and outside of the process; I also know most of the local extras personally, and when I see them in something it confirms I'm in the same universe as the show. When I as a kid, I didn't know that.
David, let's hope one day we'll appear in something of lasting importance, like one of my colleagues who was in Das Boot for a week. Or rather, let's not even hope but be realistic. :) Few things of importance are shot in Cologne and Portland, I would think.

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Sun Feb 07, 2010 9:47 am

First day of Leverage Boot Camp yesterday was terrific. They broke down the show's story arc formula, in such a way that, when you prepare for an audition, the page number of the side (sample of the script) will likely tell you what sort of archetype or stock character you'll be playing (victim, villain, fool, thug, etc.) and therefore how to prepare the dialogue.

They Skyped in one of the show's primary writers, John Rogers (who was very articulate and funny) and a director to talk to the gathering and take our questions. A line producer who has also worked a lot as first and second assistant director was there in person to tell us what the routine is on a typical shooting day and what you should do (and NOT do) when you're on the set to become beloved of the producers and crew.

Then we spent the afternoon acting sides from the show while acting teachers told us what worked, and what we needed to do to get better. What made my day especially stimulating as that I got to be the male "reader" (person who feeds the opposite lines of dialogue to the actor who's auditioning) all afternoon. So I got to show off my chops to the instructors and all the other registrants in that course, in a subtle but constant manner.

After 8 nearly straight hours of that, I walked 20 blocks in the rain to my audition for "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (this would be a great gig: outdoor performances at Oregon wineries, and $500 pay!), and despite the harriedness and relative exhaustion, did a credible series of readings for Oberon/Theseus and Bottom. Talk about a full day.

Today: another full day of Leverage Boot Camp. Today I should try to make more of an effort to network with the other folks who are taking the course.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:22 am

Second day of Leverage boot camp was terrific, as well. Aldis Hodge, who plays computer hacker and sci-fi fan Alex Hardison on the show, came in person to chat with us and take Q&A. He's a really excellent, smart, down-to-earth guy. Serious about his acting and a long-distance guy. Spent two years on Broadway in a production of "Showboat" as a child actor; starred in pilots for several failed series; was cast in a Nickelodeon series, and when he and two other supporting performers scored higher audience approval ratings than the lead, instead of ramping up the show in general, the production fired them.

Those of you who haven't already heard the news via my Facebook page, you can catch a glimpse of me in the teaser for this week's season finale of "Leverage." You remember my report about playing an illegal arms dealer during shooting last August? Well, "The Maltese Falcon Job" is on the schedule for this Wednesday, and if you go to the TNT Web site and pull up the ad for this week's show, you'll catch a swift look at me in my mustache and beard about 7 seconds in.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:16 pm

The writer-director of the 48-hour film project video that I starred in has put it online at his Web site. Some of you have already seen various earlier versions of it through my Facebook page, for those of you who haven't, go to this site, click on "Short Films" and you'll find your way to "A Hole Story":

http://www.danielkayam.com/

Be sure to watch it all the way through to the end of the credits.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:17 pm
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby Moderator » Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:14 am

As one character so perfectly put it: "Cool!"
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

cynic
Posts: 2684
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 3:55 am
Location: chicago

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby cynic » Wed Feb 17, 2010 1:48 am

second that
follow your bliss,mike

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Wed Feb 17, 2010 12:41 pm

Just in case anyone comes here without having first gone through the Pavvy:


You have a chance to get a glimpse or three of me on "Leverage," the TNT comedy caper series, this evening.

Watch for a bearded and mustached illegal arms buyer in a black suit. He will possibly be among a small group of similar unsavories on the deck of the ship, probably down in the cargo hold examining grenades, semiautomatic weapons, and rocket launchers (since I turn up in the long teaser for the episode on the TNT Web site), and possibly even to one side as Christian Kane ("Eliot") brushes past on his way to a hatch way.

Unfortunately, I won't get to see it . . . I'm in rehearsals for "King Lear," which opens next week. Can anybody out there tape it for me? (Or even better, make a digital copy?)
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Fri Feb 19, 2010 12:58 am

Well, turns out I DID get to see myself in Wednesday night's episode. "King Lear" rehearsal got out at a reasonable hour and I raced downtown to a bar I knew the local actors gather at every week to watch the show together. (I'd never been, before, but I'd hear about it on Facebook pages.)

The place was crowded; I ran into a few "old" friends (meaning actors I've met within the last five years and even done a show or two with), and a few newbies I recognized from the Leverage Boot Camp. I found a seat and prepared to hoot and holler, and did when a friend of mine turned up early in the episode as the Governor Hotel desk clerk. But then I noticed that a couple of the show's bigwigs -- executive producer Dean Devlin (also a producer on "Independence Day" and "The Patriot"), and producer Paul F. Bernard (who was doing all the bellowing on set as First Assistant Director on the "Future Job"/Luke Perry episode) -- were also in the room because they're in town to prep for the shooting of the first episodes of the new season, and from then on I kept a very low profile, because I didn't want them to think I had already been on the show. If they didn't recognize me from this episode, then I would not be prevented from getting a speaking walk-on in the new season.

Turned out the two sequences I thought I was most likely to turn up in -- walking the deck of the ship, and having Christian Kane brush by me on his way to a hatch door down below -- were cut in such a way that I wasn't there. (That might have been the back of my head or my jacket in a group heading down a ladder when Nate first confronts the villlain Kadjic on the ship.)

But I DID turn up down in the cargo hold, in the background but very clearly present in my mustache, beard, and black suit, behind the principals as they talked. So that was cool. And nobody in the bar yelled or pointed me out to everybody in those two or three quick appearances . . . which was fine with me!
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
FinderDoug
Posts: 1530
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 1:58 pm
Location: Houston, TX
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby FinderDoug » Fri Feb 19, 2010 6:23 am

I've got it on the DVR for my viewing pleasure this weekend.

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Re: David Loftus redux

Postby David Loftus » Mon Mar 01, 2010 5:59 pm

I'm decompressing from an incredibly busy week, this past.

It was tech week for "King Lear," which opened on Friday and had shows Saturday night and Sunday afternoon. Sunday morning I had a brief shoot on "Coup de Theatre," about which I've written a fair amount here already, and Sunday evening (last night) a video shoot on a different project -- university film student's senior project, a 15-minute short about a young man looking at his spiritual values in the wake of his father's death, called "Divergence." I appear briefly as an asshole psychiatrist who is no help at all with the grieving process.

Our "Lear" has a titanic actor in the title role, some fine veterans in principle roles, and community college students filling out the rest of the cast. It's a bit tech-heavy and uneven, in my opinion, but audiences have been mostly appreciative. They'd have to be, to sit through nearly three hours with a 20-minute intermission. I think the fight scenes and vivid torture of Gloucester, plus a loud and striking lightning storm, help to keep them awake. Carole says I look younger and taller in my "really cool" costumes, which is another reason to love acting.

Sunday was also the deadline for the Book Drum Tournament -- the Wikipedia-style Web site about literature that is generating its initial content with a contest featuring a 1,000-pound prize. I did an extensive profile on Bradbury's Something Wicked This Way Comes in November and December as my first entry, and yesterday morning polished off a similarly mammoth exegesis of Kundera's The Unbearable Lightness of Being, which I was working on every spare minute (including during my scene breaks in "Lear") up to nearly the final hour. It will take a month or more for the panel of judges to decide on the winners, and after that you'll be able to see the fruits of my labors online.

And of course our energetic seven-pound doggie is going in for her second surgery in two weeks tomorrow morning. Bleah.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus


Return to “Webderlanders”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest