Adventures in Eating

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

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Steve Barber
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Steve Barber » Mon Oct 06, 2014 1:34 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Do you eat pig parts like heart or snout or some such?


Not on a regular basis...
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FrankChurch
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:26 pm

You best not hang with Bourdain.

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FinderDoug
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:28 pm

Do you eat pig parts like heart or snout or some such?
Depends on the restaurant/butcher. Revival Market (which makes their own charcuterie here in Houston) has a fabulous in-house head cheese. I expect there are miscellaneous bits that also wind up in their variety of sausages. But the various organs meats are harder to turn up, if only because there's not a crushing demand. Feast (whose passing I still lament) on Westheimer was true nose-to-tail, so you'd find a dish or two on the menu utilizing offal on a fairly regular basis. (I saw it presented but didn't order it, the night they served beef cheeks STILL IN THE HEAD - I mean, dinner and a show in a single plate.) Sad part is, because they were nose-to-tail by self-description, many people steered clear completely, believing it was all heart and livers and hooves, missing the fact that on an offal-heavy night, that might be 2-3 dishes out of 16. They made a lovely scallop and white fish pie, for instance, or the caramelized brussels sprouts with bacon. (They were the place whose chef made haggis, to stellar praise, for Burns' Supper every year. I'm waiting impatiently for his new place to open - about five minutes drive from the house - early next year.) And the best sticky toffee pudding I've ever had.

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Lori Koonce » Mon Oct 06, 2014 2:49 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Do you eat pig parts like heart or snout or some such?



Seeing as how that wasn't directed to anyone in particular, I'll answer.

I've had roasted pig tail and a pig's ear sandwich. Both were amazing good.

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Steve Barber
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Steve Barber » Mon Oct 06, 2014 3:33 pm

FrankChurch wrote:You best not hang with Bourdain.


Or his friend Andrew Zimmern.
All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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FinderDoug
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Thu Oct 09, 2014 5:12 pm

This is the first autumn in Houston that I've gotten to forage for nuts from our pecan trees; we have two old beauties, one on the corner easement (technically the city's, but I've kept it alive through a drought and two aphid infestations, so I invoke the time-honored tradition of "dibs") and one along the side of the house (which survived a lightning strike some time before we moved in and is probably dead in the top three feet of the tree; the other four dead feet fell off the top back in December 2010.) The first year, we moved in after most of the nuts were ground-bug-squirrel fodder; the following year they produced very little (apparently, they groove in an on-one-year, off-the-next cycle; plus we had the drought); 2012 I had to treat them both for yellow aphids, so we gave the nuts a wide berth. Last year was another off year. So finally, this year, I've been working the lawn and fence-line, harvesting the fresh-fall and knocking loose the about-to-drops to keep them from the squirrels (who are real butterfingers with the nuts; I've found a dozen there they've gotten through the shell and started eating the nut, only to have apparently dropped it from the top (which is a long way in the top of the 50 footer.) That, or they're wasteful rodents. I need some chipmunks up in this joint.)

There's a lot of getting to know the feel of what's good/what isn't; weight doesn't describe it - I've had light nuts crack and prove to be full-fruited within; I've had heavier subjects that were desiccated. Part of it is sound. Part of it is when it drops and how long it sits. But this year, I didn't want them to go to waste, so it's been a daily sweep under the trees, discarding the obvious bad ones, and collecting the ones that may yield a result. Three hundred or so pieces so far, and I'm ready to literally get cracking on the ones that have been drying this week and see where my yield is.

Ever had a pecan right out of the shell? Nutty, for sure, but there's an undercurrent of sweet as well, more floral-sweet than sugar-sweet (or fruit-sweet, if that makes sense). My objective will be enough nuts for a pie at thanksgiving. My grandmother, who passed before I reached an age where baking interested me, was a huge fan of pecan pie. The first time I made one for Christmas, my mother paid me the highest compliment possible: "Ma would have loved this pie." So I'm stoked at the possibility I might be able to make one with pecans from my own trees. Because there's a certain measure of joy in that sort of thing (as Steve can probably attest in the realm of fun things to do with the avocado.)

Now, if I can just sort out my problems making crust from scratch (pastry sounds simple; maybe 'pastry' is; but GOOD pastry? Fucking alchemy, created by asshole wizards in an attempt to make home-ec students cry.)

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Ezra Lb. » Thu Oct 09, 2014 10:51 pm

FinderDoug, my Dad had a pecan tree on his property that furnished fruit for my Mom's pies for decades. "Had" being the operative word here, alas. A storm came up and a lightning bolt split it right in two. My Mom had a recipe that at least went back to her grandmother. You're right. Even the pecans from the farmer's market weren't as good as those fresh ripe pecans. I spent many nights as a boy shelling pecans, eating some of course, but knowing what was coming. Damn what I'd give now to have one of those pies. They were drugs. Good luck with it.


Barber, since you've revealed your persona as gentleman avocado rancher, you're kinda obligated now to give us at least one recipe for guacamole.

I've seen Anthony Bourdain's show in my travels. I enjoyed it very much. But for pete's sake get him off CNN, give him ninety minutes and flush the constant commercial interruptions.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Rick Keeney
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peregrination is not the same as adventure

Postby Rick Keeney » Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:29 am

I just triggered an oatmeal bomb in the microwave. That qualifies as an adventure, yes?

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Rick Keeney
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Rick Keeney » Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:30 am

Wait... There's a chili thread?! niiiiiiiiiiiiiiice

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Rick Keeney
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Rick Keeney » Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:33 am

:arrow:
Moderator wrote:
Chuck Messer wrote:ERMAGERD!! HE ATE FLIPPER!!!

FLIPPER, NOOOOOOOO!!!


This is your brain on drugs.


Fucking hysterical. :lol:

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Steve Barber
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Steve Barber » Fri Oct 10, 2014 8:10 am

Ezra - Gotcha on the guacamole recipe.we've got a couple of good ones. Stay tuned.
All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

diane bartels
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby diane bartels » Fri Oct 10, 2014 7:10 pm

My brother Dave made cake. I love cake. Cake is good!

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Lori Koonce » Sat Oct 11, 2014 9:42 am

for about a month and a half now, they have been having night markets where I get my produce from. Local musicians, vendors and food trucks all in one place for a few hours every Friday. I finally made it to one and man am I glad I did.

For you foodies, I must talk about the pulled pork Mac and Cheese. Creamy, made with real cheddar cheese and elbow macaroni. It was a more pale orange than boxed, but everything you'd expect outta that box. Now on top of that was an amazing pulled pork. Crispy and moist, rich in the best ways. On this was a wonderful BBQ sauce just spicy enough to cut through the richness of the meat and mac.

This is the description that Pacific Brewing Laboratory has to say about the beer I had last night. They make it, so I figure they can do it the justice it deserves.

Squid Ink India Black Ale (IBA)
This twist on a traditional West Coast IPA adds new complexity, aroma and color to a great beer style. We start with a West Coast IPA backbone and then add darker roasted grains to give a slight roasted flavor combined with a soft mouthfeel. Added with this, are citrus and pine hop aromas and a color that is the color of Squid Ink.

I had my first frozen custard last night and OMG, I wish this was more popular on the west coast. Sweet, but not cloying, creamy in a way that ice cream will never match and with a bourbon and kettle corn flavor that had me feeling like skipping outta the place. That could have been the beer though. :lol: :lol:

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FrankChurch
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Oct 13, 2014 3:17 pm

That sounds very gross, Lori, squid ink.

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FinderDoug
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Mon Oct 13, 2014 4:45 pm

You should try a nice squid ink pasta or ice cream.


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