Adventures in Eating

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Moderator » Wed Jul 02, 2014 8:38 am

FinderDoug wrote:
You and Barber must be loaded.
We are. We invented Post-it notes.


I thought it was Liquid Paper.

Oh, wait. That was Michael Nesmith's mother.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Moderator » Wed Jul 02, 2014 8:43 am

As a point of comparison, I made potato cod patties with coleslaw for dinner last night (neocon Jim and his wife were over), and we had a really nice bottle of Carlo Rossi Paisano (retail $4.99 at Ralph's). Not a lot of depth, but a subtle and smooth fruity flavor that didn't overwhelm the cod.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Ezra Lb. » Sun Sep 21, 2014 9:41 am

I was asking a while back about South African wines. Here is a Wash Post article.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle ... story.html

and some recommendations -

http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle ... story.html
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Sun Sep 21, 2014 3:15 pm

Ah, Sunday supper. We love hunkering down for big kitchen play on Sundays, because we get the time to do it up.

Tonight, while Peggy works on some braised lamb shanks in a Middle Eastern style (we got some nice spice blends on our recent Seattle swing that we're just starting to play with; using some kharcho spice and piment d'espelette ) with garbanzos and a roasted beet salad on the side, I'm working on dessert: churning a persimmon/cardamom ice cream, to pair with pumpkin goat cheese mini-tartlets (with locally sourced goat cheese from a friend of ours who operates their own goat farm and cheese-making operation). Because of the brightness of the lamb dish (between the spice blend and the preserved lemon among the braise ingredients), we're going with a 2011 Soter North Valley Reserve Chardonnay from the Willamette Valley, OR. There are some great Oregon wines to be had, if you turn over a few vineyards.

We kick around the idea of doing a once-monthly wine dinner wine dinner and inviting random friends. We might actually get around to executing on it some day.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Sep 22, 2014 10:29 am

Hoity toity there Doug.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Steve Barber » Mon Sep 22, 2014 12:09 pm

Doug and Peggy are true Foodies in the classic sense, Frank. Equally capable of appreciating both ends of the culinary spectrum.
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Mon Sep 22, 2014 2:34 pm

Hoity toity there Doug.
Really? Just gonna jump me, Frank? Take my happy Sunday with the wife, knock some of the joy out of it with an insult, fling a little shit while you're at it?

Yes, Frank: what you offered was an insult. Mister Webster, would you define "hoity toity" for us?
hoity-toity
1 hoi·ty–toi·ty - noun \ˌhȯi-tē-ˈtȯi-tē, ˌhī-tē-ˈtī-tē\
: thoughtless giddy behavior

Origin of HOITY-TOITY
rhyming compound from English dialect hoit to play the fool
First Known Use: 1668

2 hoity–toity - adjective
: having or showing the insulting attitude of people who think that they are better, smarter, or more important than other people

Full Definition of HOITY-TOITY
1: thoughtlessly silly or frivolous : flighty
2: marked by an air of assumed importance : highfalutin

--"Hoity-toity." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 22 Sept. 2014. <http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hoity-toity>

I can only presume your comment was offered because you're just down for taking pot shots now.

(And before you back-pedal with something like, "No, what I meant was that sounded fancy, that's all," I REJECT the idea that you used a negatively-weighted expression incorrectly, by accident. You're smart. You know what words mean. You've been using language a loooong time on this earth. Noam Chomsky, the linguist, is your chief go-to. You chose this idiom with intent to draw a response - and you have. You know it. I know it. So be a man and own it.)

Continue the drive-by shootings, Franklin. By all means.

But remember: they don't go unnoticed, and they're here for future reference.

And if anyone else wants a post illustrating how Frank can have a chilling effect on people sharing on these boards, I submit this is a good one. I know enough to push back after 10+ years of Frank-isms. Someone who's just come through the door? There's little to no incentive to hang around somewhere new, where they'll get characterized as I just was - by the single most prolific poster on the site - for offering an on-topic post with no intent other than to share a love of prepping food on Sundays with my wife.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Moderator » Mon Sep 22, 2014 4:58 pm

I admit, at first I read it as just a bit of smart ass, but after Doug's post I have to agree it was a deliberate insult/snipe.

Rude, Frank. Not acceptable. And I will be less tolerant of the drive-bys as a result.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Sep 22, 2014 5:18 pm

I didn't mean it as an insult. I'm sorry if you thought it was Doug.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Mon Sep 22, 2014 7:16 pm

I didn't mean it as an insult. I'm sorry if you thought it was Doug.
As God said of the turkey, this will not fly.

You should have full-stopped at 'I'm sorry,' because what follows very subtly shifts the onus from your complete (and alleged unintentional) misuse of a phrase to my apparent mis-interpretation of your meaning. You're not wrong - I just read you wrong. More crafty phraseology. Like when so-and-so-expert agrees with you.

By its VERY DEFINITION AND TYPICAL USAGE, "hoity toity" IS INTENDED to be a put-down of perceived snobbery. It has no other slant or lesser meaning. See the synonyms identified by Webster in my previous post.

That your use of it follows multiple times in the past where you have, in one fashion or another, tried to lump me in unfavorably with 'the elite' (be it with the 'elite media', or supporting a copyright law that you bemoan favors the elite) makes your selection of this phrase suspect to me. There's really a VERY NARROW WAY in which it can be taken when you know what the expression means, especially coupled with things you've said historically.

In this light, your apology is meaningless to me. It should be an apology for what you didn't mean to imply, not for me somehow misunderstanding you. I'm at a total loss as to what you MEANT - so perhaps you should explain yourself.

And perhaps also - and this is just a suggestion that you, who seem to often be misunderstood or misconstrued here, should consider taking to heart or stapling to your forehead - you should refrain from using phrases, idioms, metaphors, expressions, quotes, articles, citations, links, books, videos, films, art or ANY OTHER elements of communicating thoughts and ideas until/unless you ACTUALLY UNDERSTAND WHAT THEY MEAN first.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Ezra Lb. » Tue Sep 23, 2014 3:18 pm

FinderDoug wrote:Ah, Sunday supper. We love hunkering down for big kitchen play on Sundays, because we get the time to do it up.

Tonight, while Peggy works on some braised lamb shanks in a Middle Eastern style (we got some nice spice blends on our recent Seattle swing that we're just starting to play with; using some kharcho spice and piment d'espelette ) with garbanzos and a roasted beet salad on the side, I'm working on dessert: churning a persimmon/cardamom ice cream, to pair with pumpkin goat cheese mini-tartlets (with locally sourced goat cheese from a friend of ours who operates their own goat farm and cheese-making operation). Because of the brightness of the lamb dish (between the spice blend and the preserved lemon among the braise ingredients), we're going with a 2011 Soter North Valley Reserve Chardonnay from the Willamette Valley, OR. There are some great Oregon wines to be had, if you turn over a few vineyards.

We kick around the idea of doing a once-monthly wine dinner wine dinner and inviting random friends. We might actually get around to executing on it some day.


My baloney sandwich suddenly loses its allure. :(
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Tue Sep 23, 2014 3:33 pm

My baloney sandwich suddenly loses its allure.
Nah. Good baloney is a lovely thing. I still make basic egg salad for the sheer fatty, eggy joy of it.

We have a wine guy here, Justin - just opened his own wine bar downtown. Has no real kitchen, but of the three bar snacks he has, there's a house-made baloney, served seared (about a 1/4 in. slice), with a smoked gouda spread and Ritz crackers. It's weird, it's sounds silly, but it's wonderfully balanced between rich/salty and works really well as a bar snack at a wine bar.

Everything has its place on earth. Except mustard. Cut my sandwich with a knife that touched mustard, and it goes into your chest next. (Mustard, I'm a fanatic about. No way, no how. Peggy's gotten me through pickles and curry and beets and a host of other things, but I will not abide mustard.)

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Steve Barber » Tue Sep 23, 2014 3:39 pm

Don't I have a photo of you somewhere with a be-mustarded Pink's hot dog?

I'm away from home, else wise could summon the image directly.
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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby Steve Barber » Tue Sep 23, 2014 3:46 pm

Loco Moco

For you guys who may think Esther and I have lost our marbles, Loco Moco is a Hawaiian dish invented in Hilo, served for breakfast lunch and dinner.

One or more fried or grilled beef patties -- preferably with some sort of spices or flavoring like diced onions, etc.
One or more fried eggs with the yolk still soft.
Brown gravy
Served over white rice.

Salt and pepper to taste

Yeah. That easy.
All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Re: Adventures in Eating

Postby FinderDoug » Tue Sep 23, 2014 4:38 pm

Don't I have a photo of you somewhere with a be-mustarded Pink's hot dog?
Nope. You have a photo of me with a Pink's hot dog. If it's dressed, it's with chili and onions, or BBQ sauce, or catsup as the isle of last resort. If I couldn't get it that way, it's plain. (Pickle relish is still an almost non-starter today; back then, that too would have be verboten.)(Gosh, that was a fun day. Even with the parking ticket.)

***
Loco Moco sounds like it would fit right in here in Texas (with elements befitting both the Mexi tradition and good ol' fashioned southern comfort food.)


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