THE PAVILION ANNEX

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

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Chuck Messer
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Chuck Messer » Wed Jul 08, 2009 7:03 am

I'm afraid I'm coming to this party a bit late. The furniture has been righted and the broken crockery has been swept away. The blood has been mopped up, etc.

So, WTF happened at the Pavilion? I must have been at work when it happened, but it sounds serious. All that talk about Harlan closing down the Pav or not coming back, Susan being insulted, etc.

I mean, damn.

Chuck
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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Wed Jul 08, 2009 12:23 pm

Calm down Coil, calm down. Rubs his shoulders.

It will be fine.

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Wed Jul 08, 2009 12:45 pm

Seriously? Nothing happened - uncapitalized Alan made a joke that may refer to something or not and somebody cleaned his clock. Didn't see any references to the Pav. being shut down, especially not by Harlan. There is so much borderline disrespectful and dumb stuff on the Pav. every week, I see nothing out if the ordinary happening. I so wish people wouldn't use the Pavilion as their thought diary or to try out new jokes. People shouldn't waste Harlan's time, let alone offend his intelligence. Also, is anyone else annoyed by people not capitalizing their own names? In front of Harlan too.

Apparently one can take nothing for granted; Rick should write ten pages of rules for posters to cover the basics. Opinions?

The good news it that Harlan's doesn't enjoy the Pavilion any more than he absolutely has to. If everyone was Barney and Barber, he'd get addicted.

Frank, that YouTube comment was a great one, summing up well what we've been talking about for the past weeks. :?:
Kirby: Nor did we thing you had anything else.

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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Wed Jul 08, 2009 1:25 pm

Jan, I have been here a lot longer than you. I know for a fact that Harlan loves, actually, adores me. Sure he can be abrasive, but that is only when I deserve it. And I take my lumps like Curly and move on.

I start more conversations than anybody here. Take that for what it is. As you know, I am a humble little prig. Kiss

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We're Called...THE ARISTOCRATS!!!!!!!!!

Postby Gwyneth M905 » Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:59 pm

Jan wrote:You guys are not worthy of being in the same room with the likes of Gwyneth and me.


...and they weren't invited either... :P :wink:
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But seriously folks...re: Gary's post on the Pavvy

Postby Gwyneth M905 » Wed Jul 08, 2009 10:08 pm

Gary's post on the Pavilion made my stomach drop. Wow. He should be in here telling HIS story! I don't blame him for hating McNamara so much. I'm creeped out by the guy (RSM) after seeing "The Fog of War".

P.S. I'm all PMS-pissy 'cause of Le's post. DUH! "died peacefully in his sleep" I was quoting the frickin' Times! I didn't need a "ahem" MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL to tell me it was probably bullshit. My only point was, however erratic his breathing was, however many morphine drips he may or may not have had, he certainly had an easier death than those kids he sent to 'nam.
OK, Barber, the floggings may commence. I'll assume the position. :wink:
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Chuck Messer
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Chuck Messer » Thu Jul 09, 2009 6:56 am

Okay, so the alan brouhaha in the Pav was much ado about nada. Good. Rick seemed to have done an exemplary job handling the situation.

I'm just glad it was nothing much.

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Re: But seriously folks...re: Gary's post on the Pavvy

Postby Moderator » Thu Jul 09, 2009 11:20 am

Gwyneth M905 wrote:OK, Barber, the floggings may commence. I'll assume the position. :wink:



Nah.

The definition of sadism is knowing what some really wants and refusing to give it to them. :twisted: 8)
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Moderator » Thu Jul 09, 2009 11:23 am

Chuck Messer wrote:Okay, so the alan brouhaha in the Pav was much ado about nada. Good. Rick seemed to have done an exemplary job handling the situation.

I'm just glad it was nothing much.

Chuck


It really wasn't much IMHO. An attempt at humor gone bad, that's all. The reaction to it: protecting "our own" was also predictable.

Rick handled it well, and I agree with him that a simple email would have been appropriate as a response. Angst not being good for our health, and all that.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Re: But seriously folks...re: Gary's post on the Pavvy

Postby Coil 2.0 » Thu Jul 09, 2009 12:07 pm

Gwyneth M905 wrote:P.S. I'm all PMS-pissy 'cause of Le's post. DUH! "died peacefully in his sleep" I was quoting the frickin' Times! I didn't need a "ahem" MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL to tell me it was probably bullshit.


I understand where you're coming from. Le was trying to impart knowledge, but it was knowledge I guess I didn't want to know. Icky mainly because my friend's mother just died at 80 on Saturday in a hospital's rehab wing. Poor woman was on oxygen for the last 5 years, and had suffered through congestive heart failure for about 25 years.

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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Thu Jul 09, 2009 1:26 pm

I warned you all about Gary. Those right leaning suckers have no screws to lose.

Never thought Coil would be my hero.

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Re: But seriously folks...re: Gary's post on the Pavvy

Postby Gwyneth M905 » Thu Jul 09, 2009 5:40 pm

Coil 2.0 wrote:I understand where you're coming from. Le was trying to impart knowledge, but it was knowledge I guess I didn't want to know. Icky mainly because my friend's mother just died at 80 on Saturday in a hospital's rehab wing. Poor woman was on oxygen for the last 5 years, and had suffered through congestive heart failure for about 25 years.


Oh, Alan, I'm so sorry! :( For what it's worth, and I've been with three elderly people through their deaths, I think that it may be something harder to watch than to experience.

I had my own near-death experience. I "bled out" in a Philly ER, they lost my pulse, and I had a Code Blue called on me. I went from agonizing pain to a very peaceful place where I was not experiencing any pain and DID actually have that sensation of looking down on the activities in the room. Being brought back to life (having my heart restarted) was one hell of a lot more painful than the dying process was. I'll just drop this topic here, out of respect for you, and for your feelings. If it would help, please pass along my condolences to your friend.
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Coil 2.0
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Coil 2.0 » Thu Jul 09, 2009 9:06 pm

Thanks.

Looking again at my post, I see that the main point I was trying to make is that timing is everything. A week earlier or later and I might not have even noticed.
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby David Silver » Fri Jul 10, 2009 12:30 pm

Hi Jan,

I heard my share of stories about World War II from family and friends...

My step grandfather on my mom's side (my grandmother was married eight times...don't ask!) was a full colonel in the US army. During the European campaign after D-day, he was the officer in charge of advance reconnaissance for General Patton. He told me many stories of the campaign, but there was one event about which he was particularly proud. There was a difficult river crossing to be made, over a small bridge that neither side wanted to lose, and Patton knew the German forces had to have well entrenched protection hidden in the forest beyond. It was obviously a trap. My grandfather was sent ahead, with just a pair of infantry to back him up, to locate the enemy positions. Avoiding detection through the night, he spotted and map marked five large gun emplacements, and reported back to Patton. Based on my grandfathers initial reconnaissance, and while he later broke radio silence while acting as the forward observer sitting just a scant 50 yards short of the bridge, at first light the next morning the US army lobbed a surprise long range artillery attack over the river, completely wiping out four of the five German emplacements with the first salvo, and only needed a brief second salvo to finish the last. The German infantry waiting beyond the gun emplacements immediately retreated when they realized they'd have absolutely no artillery cover of their own, and Patton's troops marched over that bridge unobstructed later in the morning. For this extraordinary accomplishment (even with modern computer assisted methods of spotting, to successfully triangulate and wipe out five such hidden emplacements in one quick attack is simply unheard of), my grandfather received a major service commendation, the medal pinned to his chest by Patton himself several days later. He was with Patton all the way to the end, and he had the medals and ribbons to prove it (including two purple hearts), but he always liked to remind people of one thing. Wherever Patton went, my grandfather got there first!

My uncle (my mom's half sister's third husband...once again, don't ask!) was a Pearl Harbor survivor. He wouldn't talk much about it, other than to say it was like walking through hell. He was right there in the middle of the bombing, racing on and off the fire swept sinking ships, trying to save people. When the big screen film "Tora, Tora, Tora" came out, he went to see it, and had only one comment. He said the film did not remotely capture the horror of the day. By his recollection, it was much, much worse...
We don't stop playing because we grow old.
We grow old because we stop playing.

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David Loftus
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby David Loftus » Fri Jul 10, 2009 2:57 pm

Neat story, David!

Two my Mom's brothers served in U.S. Army uniform in the Pacific theater while the rest of the family was carted off to the internment camps. Uncle Half (from nickname "Half-Pint," because he was so small) had browbeat his Dad into okaying his enlistment in mid 1941, while Uncle Tot was drafted the week before Pearl Harbor. Because of some sort of security technicality, they weren't even allowed to enter the camps to visit their family on furlough!

I once chatted with Uncle Tot about his service in the Philippines campaign but couldn't get any vivid stories out of him. (Half died in an auto accident shortly after the war.) Being fluent in Japanese, Tot served mostly in Intelligence, translating papers found on dead Japanese soldiers. Most of their letters said pretty much the same things our U.S. servicemen wrote home, he remarked. When I asked him about prejudice against him in the service, he didn't recall much of any; what he felt bad about, he said, was the way the black soldiers and sailors got stuck down in the darkest, dirtiest part of the ships.

It was the racism and prejudice my uncles and the family suffered after they came back home to Hood River, Oregon that was truly ugly.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus


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