THE PAVILION ANNEX

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

Moderator: Moderator

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Robert Nason » Sun May 25, 2014 2:36 pm

I seem to recall that the Universal logo was cut off when I first saw THE BIRDS on network television, so I assumed there was more to come. And Hitchcock did intend to have a final shot of the car approaching the Golden Gate Bridge and showing it covered from one end to the other with birds. But that turned out to be unfeasible.
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
robochrist
Posts: 3426
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 1:30 pm

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby robochrist » Sun May 25, 2014 2:56 pm

The original script called for a final action-packed showdown with the birds attacking their convertible and tearing through the roof. Hitchcock chose to leave it out. I'm glad he did.

User avatar
Ezra Lb.
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:02 am
Location: Washington, DC

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Ezra Lb. » Sun May 25, 2014 6:50 pm

Have any of you read the Daphne du Maurier short story on which the movie is based? Interesting to compare the movie with the source material.

A case where a new movie could made that would only have a slight relationship with Hitchcock's movie. You could take a completely different approach than a psycho-sexual drama. Without providing any spoilers I will say that du Maurier's original tale is more of a cold war parable. Could have easily been made into a 50s SF movie.

Growing up watching this movie on TV late at night (or on Saturday afternoons) I always thought of THE BIRDS as a SF movie. It was only later at school that I made the connection of the movie as a "Hitchcock" movie. I remember thinking, the guy that made NORTH BY NORTHWEST made this?
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Robert Nason » Sun May 25, 2014 7:18 pm

I read the du Maurier short story The Birds when I was a kid, in the Scholastic paperback STORIES OF SUSPENSE. The anthology included such gems as Jack Finney's Of Missing Persons, Lord Dunsany's Two Bottles of Relish, and Daniel Keyes' Flowers for Algernon, as well as stories by John Collier and Roald Dahl. Not a bad lineup. But I don't recall the du Maurier story in any detail except that it felt terribly British. Did it really have a Cold War subtext?

Trivia question: How many Hitchcock movies are based on du Maurier works?
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Tue May 27, 2014 8:43 am

The ending of the Birds is classic. Have they stopped? Will they attack again? Did they win the first part of a war?

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Robert Nason » Tue May 27, 2014 8:14 pm

There was a really crappy TV-movie some years ago called THE BIRDS II: LAND'S END, but I can't even recall if I watched it to the end.
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:17 pm
Contact:

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Moderator » Wed May 28, 2014 10:35 am

Robert Nason wrote:There was a really crappy TV-movie some years ago called THE BIRDS II: LAND'S END, but I can't even recall if I watched it to the end.



Yeah, well, a coupla' British ladies open a retail store. What were you expecting?
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Robert Nason » Wed May 28, 2014 5:44 pm

:lol:
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
robochrist
Posts: 3426
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 1:30 pm

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby robochrist » Wed May 28, 2014 9:24 pm

Robert, many posts ago I was going to follow up on an observation you made about Brando, but I got myself sidetracked.

To wit:

"LIMELIGHT would have been a perfect farewell, but unfortunately Chaplin went on to make two more films which are fairly unwatchable. Marlon Brando could not do slapstick."

Brando wasn't the only great actor whose limitations were apparent in the format of high comedy. Gregory Peck had no sense of timing or delivery for ANY type of comedy.

User avatar
Ezra Lb.
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:02 am
Location: Washington, DC

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed May 28, 2014 9:36 pm

I read the du Maurier short story The Birds when I was a kid, in the Scholastic paperback STORIES OF SUSPENSE. The anthology included such gems as Jack Finney's Of Missing Persons, Lord Dunsany's Two Bottles of Relish, and Daniel Keyes' Flowers for Algernon, as well as stories by John Collier and Roald Dahl. Not a bad lineup. But I don't recall the du Maurier story in any detail except that it felt terribly British. Did it really have a Cold War subtext?

Terrific! I had that book! One of my first introductions to the real thing as opposed to the kiddie stuff. I had not thought of that in years. Didn't it also have Donald Wollheim's creepy as shit story, Mimic as well? (Later made into a just plain shit movie alas.) Could be thinking of another collection. I do remember Finney's story though. Wow.

The Cold War subtext is not blatant but it's there. The bird attack waves come from the east (get it get it) and it has that apocalyptic World War III ambiance to it. Interestingly she does little with the ecological angle. The ending is not a clear resolution but it's also not ambiguous. Find it if you can and check it out in light of the movie.

There was a really crappy TV-movie some years ago called THE BIRDS II: LAND'S END...

Of course... :roll: Please don't tell me Tipi Hedren did a cameo as the Mother of one of the characters.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

User avatar
robochrist
Posts: 3426
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 1:30 pm

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby robochrist » Wed May 28, 2014 10:32 pm

...tv movie...THE BIRDS II: LAND'S END... Please don't tell me Tipi Hedren did a cameo as the Mother of one of the characters.


It seems she did EXACTLY that!

And I thought she'd suffered enough with her disasterous undertaking called ROAR. (however well-intentioned)

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Robert Nason » Thu May 29, 2014 2:01 am

Ezra -- Yeah, it's true. Tippi Hedren needed money in the mid-90s to pay for the upkeep of her "big cats" and took the role of "Helen" in the movie -- whoever that is.

But the Wollheim story "Mimic" didn't appear in that Scholastic book but in the Mayflower-Dell paperback MONSTER MIX, as well as a bunch of other books.

Rob -- I can't imagine Gregory Peck doing comedy. (Though I found him pretty funny playing Dr. Mengele in THE BOYS FROM BRAZIL.)
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
robochrist
Posts: 3426
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2004 1:30 pm

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby robochrist » Thu May 29, 2014 2:48 am

I saw Peck in a little known early 50's British comedy under Alexander Korda's company. If any lines were funny at all, Gregory Peck had no apprent ability to make them work. He was supposed to do a lot of deadpan reaction to amusing circumstances I no longer remember. But - shit! - he was SUCH a bore. In Brando's case, by contrast, I am confident in his ability at THAT type of comedy, putting slapstick out of the game (which I never saw him try; I'm taking your word for it on that one, but it's not hard to believe). I only saw clips from 1990s THE FRESHMAN, and he looked pretty amusing. Roger Ebert gave that movie a rave review, but I came to distrust him with comedies. So, the movie notwithstaning, Brando seemed good with the material (and, in subtle ways, he did some humorous stuff playing Don Corleone, which this latter role had parodied). By contrast, I'd have no hope for Peck in such a role. He was better off in stuff like SPELLBOUND and, obviously, TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD.

An interesting thing, though, I often find that dramatic actors are better at doing comedy roles than comedians. The right ones - often character actors - know how to vary their mannerisms and deliveries whereas comedians rely more on their marketed personalities and trademark material. Shining examples include Carroll O'Conner, Ed O'Neal, Ted Knight, Ed Asner, Larry Linville, Ted Danson, Bryan Cranston; THEN ya got yer Spencer Tracy, Herbert Lom, Frederic March, and Peter Ustinov. (I didn't throw Cary Grant there because I think of him as the other set, the comic actor who can do drama)

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Robert Nason » Thu May 29, 2014 11:32 am

I admit I haven't seen THE FRESHMAN, but my dad loves the film and finds Brando's parody of his Godfather role hilarious.

I think comics have better luck doing dramatic roles than dramatic actors have playing comic ones. Think of such comics as Jackie Gleason in THE HUSTLER; Don Rickles in CASINO; Jerry Lewis in THE KING OF COMEDY; Shelley Berman in THE BEST MAN; ROBIN WILLIAMS in....I don't know, something.

Certain actors can do both comedy and drama effortlessly, even simultaneously. Think Chaplin and Jack Lemmon. (It's no accident that Lemmon was the one who presented the Lifetime Achievement Oscar to Chaplin in 1972.)
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

Mark Tiedemann
Posts: 2575
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 1:51 pm

Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Thu May 29, 2014 11:52 am

Robin Williams in GOOD WILL HUNTING.


Return to “General”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests