Enter the Mentor. . .

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

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FrankChurch
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby FrankChurch » Mon Jun 15, 2009 6:56 pm

Bill Ayers is good on education.

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Steve Evil
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Steve Evil » Tue Jun 16, 2009 8:47 am

Ezra Lb. wrote:
Has No Child Left Behind seeped across the border yet?



Oh yeah, though they call it somethin' else. . .

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Ezra Lb. » Tue Jun 16, 2009 1:34 pm

Some wit in the States called it No Child Escapes...

There is a depressing article in today's Wash Post lamenting how student participation in the arts is decreasing. An attempt was made to blame it on the economy but the arts classes are the first things cut to make room for standardized test study. Even Obama seems snookered by this bs.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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FrankChurch
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby FrankChurch » Tue Jun 16, 2009 2:28 pm

Tests don't tell us anything about actual intellect. It's just a corrupt way to push kids out of school and into the job market, since schooling tends to trains subordination to authority.

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Steve Evil
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Steve Evil » Wed Jun 17, 2009 9:55 am

You're half right there. Tests don't tell us anything about intellect - they're just numbers governments can point to to justify their policy's (or attack the opposition's). But they're not designed to push kids out of school. They're designed to keep them in. Graduation rates are considered a measure of success, so a school dare not fail anybody if they expect proper funding, or allow a kid to discover his own path. Lock them in, and we have high enrolement, high graduation rates, and high test results, which look great during elections.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Jun 17, 2009 10:22 am

You're half right there.

Great work, Frank! You're making progress my friend. Usually you're completely wrong abut everything.

Heh heh heh... :)
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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FrankChurch
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby FrankChurch » Wed Jun 17, 2009 3:29 pm

Dylag, yea, you're right. Cowers.

Gwyneth M905
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Gwyneth M905 » Mon Jul 06, 2009 9:22 am

:D :D :D CONGRATULATIONS (belatedly) STEVE!!!! :D :D :D

What grades/subjects are you teaching?

(((hugs)))
I want to learn the ways of the Force and become a Jedi Knight, the same as my Father.
STAR WARS (1977)

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Steve Evil
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Steve Evil » Mon Jul 06, 2009 7:15 pm

Never too late!

Mainly elementary school, though I'm taking an online qualifier for high school English (which is the most monotonious, tediuous, dreary, demoralizing things I've ever done, but that's another story - I actually love teaching, as long as the machines and the administrators don't get in the way).

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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Gwyneth M905 » Mon Jul 06, 2009 8:53 pm

Steve Evil wrote:Never too late!

Mainly elementary school, though I'm taking an online qualifier for high school English (which is the most monotonous, tedious, dreary, demoralizing things I've ever done, but that's another story - I actually love teaching, as long as the machines and the administrators don't get in the way).


So how does the certification process work in Canada? Is it a 4 year degree? With what degrees did you start out? What was the internship period like, or are you going through that now? I'm fascinated 'cause the stories of one of my best friends who works as a substitute teacher are making me seriously consider this profession. (Plus, I like standing up in front of a bunch of people and telling stories...that helps too! :wink: )
I want to learn the ways of the Force and become a Jedi Knight, the same as my Father.
STAR WARS (1977)

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Steve Evil
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Steve Evil » Mon Jul 06, 2009 9:58 pm

Well, it could be done one of two ways: either during your Undergrad, where you take the pedagogical stuff alongside whatever teachable subject who want (say English or Science) and do it over the course of four years, OR you could enrol in a program AFTER you complte your Undergraduate Degree, and get it done in one year, which is what I did.

Because I was going for the Elementary Level, I needed one Teachable subject (basically whatever you majored in, or a minumium number of University credits in that particular subject. Mine was Humanities, which I think they counted toward English) and takes teaching and learning theory course in practically every subject - Math, Language Arts, Science, Phys-Ed, Music, Art, Educational Psychology, Special Education and one extra course for your teachable (so, I took two language Arts courses). On top of that there are ten weeks of practice teaching in a school, divided up into three week blocks. I don't imagine it's much different in the US; indeed, a friend of mine went to an American school and is now teaching in Ontario. (Not to mention most of our readings were from American journals).

My own take on the whole process is this:

Teaching is a wonderful profession. I got into it for the same reasons you cited: I like telling stories. And I like kids. I worked for years as a drama instructor before I decided to do it for real. The system of gaining your qualification is quite miserable. I found that very little of the course content was directly relevant to actual practice. We were often assessed and judged on the wrong things. I found the educational journals to be a landfill of crackpot ideas and really, really bad writing (ironically, some of the worst of it comes from the literacy journals). The system in Ontario is mainly driven by politics and beaurocracy. Teachers themselves have hardly any say over classroom or education policy. Generally speaking, it is not a system that rewards truly creative or independantly minded people. I've become truly cynical about the whole business. The only saving grace is that this all ceases to matter once you get some actual students to work with. At least I hope so: two of my three practicums were wonderful, and I wouldn't have traded them for the world.

Sorry for the rant. But I needed to get it off my chest.

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FrankChurch
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby FrankChurch » Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:48 am

As long as you teach the children to think for themselves, read what they want, etc. Expand their imagination. I know you can do that. Sweetbunz.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Jul 08, 2009 2:12 pm

As long as you teach the children to think for themselves, read what they want, etc. Expand their imagination.

Which of course would get you serious jail time here in the States.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Lori Koonce » Wed Jul 08, 2009 4:46 pm

Ezra Lb. wrote:As long as you teach the children to think for themselves, read what they want, etc. Expand their imagination.

Which of course would get you serious jail time here in the States.


That depens on how you go about doing it Ezra.

One of the most profound experiences I ever had in High School happened because an English teacher allowed me and a fellow student to argue nueclar arms in his classroom on our lunch hour.

The really cool thing is that what I learned had more to do with how strangely deluded the political right was than English. I suppose that was because the teacher was a Berekely grad, but one can never be too sure.


Lori

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Steve Evil
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Re: Enter the Mentor. . .

Postby Steve Evil » Wed Jul 08, 2009 6:41 pm

Lori, I think your teacher would be delighted to hear that. Every teacher dreams of having some kind of lasting effect beyond his or her subject specialty.


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