David Loftus question

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Sun Dec 14, 2008 12:27 pm

Mike, in another time and place they would have kept me.

Thank your lucky stars you live in a free country. Free because of years of struggle and activism, not because me fought in wars.

cynic
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Postby cynic » Sun Dec 14, 2008 6:31 pm

yep

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Mon Dec 15, 2008 6:23 pm

Rehearsals are on hiatus for the holidays. During which time I have to learn all my lines. I'd prefer to learn by rehearsing them, but that's not my decision to make. This Cladwell guy is a real SOB. . .

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Dec 16, 2008 9:26 am

He's an SOB because he makes you learn your lines? That's his job Steve.

hhehe

Just excel at the play and show that SOB Steve Dylag is all that.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Dec 16, 2008 12:36 pm

Steve Evil wrote:Rehearsals are on hiatus for the holidays. During which time I have to learn all my lines. I'd prefer to learn by rehearsing them, but that's not my decision to make. This Cladwell guy is a real SOB. . .


I know how you're feeling. We have first read tonight, then a holiday break before our first actual rehearsal after the New Year. But the director would like us to be "off book" for the first rehearsal. First time that's been requested in a show I've done, but the expectation makes me feel good: more time to get the timing, blocking, and pacing down. (Not to mention the British dialect.)

In contrast to the Shakespeare and classic Greek shows I've been doing of late, which featured lots of long speeches, this show has real rapid-fire comic dialogue, mostly: a lot of two- to five-word sentences. So I've recorded the other people's lines on cassette in order to interact with them on a Sony Walkman as soon as I have a grasp of my lines. First time I've done this.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Tue Dec 16, 2008 1:32 pm

That's actually not a bad idea; wish I'd thought of it. I find it much harder to learn anything without other people around.

When I'm up on my feet interacting with the other actors and taking directions, I usually know most of the dialogue by the end of the session. Whereas when I'm sitting at home cramming like its for some kind of spelling test, I could be at it all night and still mess up the next day.

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robochrist
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Postby robochrist » Tue Dec 16, 2008 5:33 pm

David,

"So I've recorded the other people's lines on cassette in order to interact with them on a Sony Walkman as soon as I have a grasp of my lines. First time I've done this."

Sounds like a great technique. If I were an actor I'd probably do precisely that.

Pertinently, I was looking at the methods used by Johnny Depp. I used to be a die-hard fan, but of late, his routine in preparing for a role has struck me as way too gimicky. Y'know: this bit of taking different actors and celebrities as a model for each role. It's more like impressionism than acting; this only flattens a character. That's not so bad, of course, for most of the movies he's been doing. They aren't meant to be taken too seriously and therefore the characters aren't. But if he were to take a "Brando"-type role, I'd really get turned off by that approach. A serious role is when you dig beneath the surface of the character, working from inside out.

I still like Depp. But I no longer venerate him so blindly as I used to. Who knows about the future? But for now, he's no Robert DeNiro.

Depp once declared that his hero was Lon Chaney (Sr). I could see why, and I really admire that. But Chaney didn't mime other celebrities; he explored the characters and then applied mime.

Anyway, sounds like you've some fun lined up for yourself.

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robochrist
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Postby robochrist » Tue Dec 16, 2008 5:34 pm

I meant "GIMMICKY", of course.

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Dec 16, 2008 5:36 pm

Depp is just a pretty boy. Phillip Seymore Hoffman can run circles around that oaf.

Ugly guys unite!

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robochrist
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Postby robochrist » Tue Dec 16, 2008 6:59 pm

"Depp is just a pretty boy."

He's no more "just" a pretty boy than YOU are.

cynic
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Postby cynic » Tue Dec 16, 2008 8:02 pm

steve,david,
regarding learning lines;recording the script(even in your own voice), without your lines included,and responding aloud,might that work?

perhaps HEARING the lines ,as opposed to,reading them will help.A left/right brain thing?

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Wed Dec 17, 2008 8:51 am

Well, at least I'm pretty.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Wed Dec 17, 2008 9:38 am

cynic wrote:regarding learning lines;recording the script(even in your own voice), without your lines included,and responding aloud,might that work?



That's what I meant. That's precisely what I'm doing. I think I learn lines better -- faster and more accurately -- if I say them out loud (or at the very least mouth them very quietly in public) -- than if I read them to myself over and over. I have to FEEL them in my mouth, feel the shapes they make my lips and tongue and teeth and throat have to make, to get them down.

Speaking of which, who remembers the Monty Python routine, "Learn to be a Great Actor in Your Own Home"? It may only have been on a recording -- "Matching Tie and Handkerchief"?

"Shot off! . . . Completely? . . . Oh, Charles. . . ."
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Wed Dec 17, 2008 9:42 am

Steve Evil wrote:When I'm up on my feet interacting with the other actors and taking directions, I usually know most of the dialogue by the end of the session. Whereas when I'm sitting at home cramming like its for some kind of spelling test, I could be at it all night and still mess up the next day.


I think there's very little way around the latter part, but I agree with you that movement really helps solidify the dialogue. I experience what you're describing on the first part in the opposite direction: lots of actors in my milieu write tons of notes on their scripts about movement and gestures when the blocking is being worked out, but I rarely write anything down, because I tend to remember the movements very well when I already have the lines and have done them together a bit.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Postby paul » Wed Dec 17, 2008 11:39 pm

David Loftus wrote:Speaking of which, who remembers the Monty Python routine, "Learn to be a Great Actor in Your Own Home"? It may only have been on a recording -- "Matching Tie and Handkerchief"?

"Shot off! . . . Completely? . . . Oh, Charles. . . ."


I have the double cassette of MP's The Final Cut (not to be confused with the Pink Floyd album) and that's one of the tracks on there.

It's neat, only listening to sketch after sketch (the Architects' Sketch, Dead Parrot) that I've seen. I really enjoy filling in the pictures in my head. I mean, I like the show just fine, but there's something pleasant about doing things around the house, dishes, laundry, and listening to that kind of spoken word, as it were.
Same with my Ipod. I keep the 30's/40's radio dramas, Sherlock Holmes, all that and listen to them infinitely more often than the music.

Continued well wishes, youse guys. Learn well and accurately.
The medium is the message.


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